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Camera Reviews

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Arlo Pro 2 review: The best wireless camera still has some drawbacks

It's getting easier to set up your own internet-connected home surveillance system, but that usually still means running cables to power all your fancy HD cameras. Arlo, which recently spun off from Netgear, offers an alternative. Its Arlo Pro line of cameras can keep tabs on your home without wires, and they last for months on a charge.

After wowing us with the original Arlo Pro, the Arlo Pro 2 ups the resolution and adds new features. At the same time, Arlo has finally rolled out its AI-enabled Arlo Smart system to compete with systems like Nest Aware. Can a wireless camera ever compete with wired, though?

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Nest Cam IQ Outdoor review: A must-have for Nest fans but too expensive for everyone else

Nest started by making thermostats, but following a Google acquisition and some reshuffling, it makes plenty of other smart home products. Having devoured Dropcam, Nest is one of the leaders in home security cameras with products like the Nest Cam and smarter Cam IQ. It had a "regular" outdoor camera previously, but now you can get an outdoor version of the IQ. The Nest Cam IQ Outdoor packs a 4K image sensor, a wide field-of-view, facial recognition, and incredibly sharp video. It's also one of the most robust outdoor cameras when it comes to tolerating cold weather.

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Anker Roav C1 Pro & C2 Pro review: Not your average dashcams

Everyone knows you should keep a spare tire in the trunk of your car, and possibly tools like jumper cables and scissor jacks. Dashcams can be just as helpful as those, but many American drivers never install one. This can be for many different reasons — most them are ugly, the driver thinks they don't need one, and so on.

Anker makes a few car-related products under its 'Roav' brand. We already reviewed the Roav Viva car charger with Alexa, but Anker also produces several dashcams. The C1 Pro (R2120) and C2 Pro (R2220) have been on the market for nearly a year, currently priced at $106 and $140, respectively.

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Review: Moment's modular lenses up your Pixel 2's photography game... if you have a few hundred bucks lying around

The cameras on smartphones are getting ridiculously good --- good to the point that most households don't even own standalone cameras anymore. But given the dimensions that phone cameras are restricted to, they're not as flexible as something like a mirrorless or DSLR with interchangeable lenses. That's where Moment comes in. The company offers a small collection of lenses that can be individually purchased and attached to its Photo Cases, which are available for a variety of phones.

Of course, this isn't the first time that someone has come up with the idea of attaching lenses to phones. There are loads of cheap solutions on Amazon, though none are as high-quality and cohesive.

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Logitech Circle 2 wired camera review: A feature-packed premium camera

Logitech has been making webcams for many years, and a while back it turned its attention to the burgeoning home security market with the Logitech Circle camera. I thought that device was a surprisingly good value that competed well with established players like Netgear and Nest. There's a second generation camera now, and it improves on that first camera in almost every way. If you don't mind a few minor foibles, this could be the right camera to keep an eye on your humble abode.

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Netatmo Welcome review: A near perfect no-hidden-fees indoor security camera with face recognition

Netatmo's approach to security cameras is refreshing. In a market that's filled with companies limiting what you can do with the hardware you bought just in order to get you to sign up for a monthly subscription, Netatmo asks only that you purchase its camera. Video storage is free thanks to MicroSD card support as well as optional Dropbox and FTP uploads. Face recognition is free and gets better with time as it learns. A web app is provided so you can monitor everything from your computer, not just your phone. And privacy is respected because nothing other than a backup screenshot is sent to the Netatmo Cloud.

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Amazon Cloud Cam review: A good value but missing some features

Amazon offers various cloud services to consumers as well as businesses. In fact, some makers of home security cameras use Amazon's web services to store video. It only makes sense for Amazon to get into this market as it increasingly pushes home automation with Alexa. The Cloud Cam is a 1080p indoor security camera with a competitive price point of $120 when it's not on sale. This camera has a lot going for it, but it's clear Amazon is still just getting started with home security—the Cloud Cam is missing just enough that other cameras might be better options, even if they're more expensive.

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FrontRow review: An interesting concept, but not a great buy at $399

Cameras are absolutely essential to our lives these days. After all, what would we do without our Snapchat Stories and Instagram selfies? How else would we communicate with the outside world? There's a reason why cameras have been crammed into everything from smartwatches to quadcopters; the ability to capture our memories so easily and in such great detail, then share them with anyone we'd like to, is simply amazing.

Ubiquiti Networks, a company most famous for its WiFi equipment, thinks so too. Nearly two months ago, it debuted the FrontRow, a camera that you wear on your body so that you can capture great moments without compromising your own live experience.

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Reolink Keen and Argus review: Affordable wireless security cams, but full of compromises

We've been taking a thorough look at smart monitoring cameras here on Android Police, but the overarching complaint in most of them from us and you, the readers, is always the price and the paid plans. That's why for my next two reviews, I will be focusing on two camera makers that don't require you break the bank to buy their hardware nor to use it. The first brand is Reolink and I'll be reviewing two of its cameras: the Keen ($119.99) and the Argus ($99.99), both of which offer MicroSD storage. (The second brand is Amcrest, which I'll review in a week or so.)

In many respects, the Keen and Argus are similar: both are battery-powered, both have 1080p live streaming, motion detection, and night vision, and both need a MicroSD card for storage.

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FLIR One Pro review: An excellent mobile thermal camera, for a price

FLIR's name is essentially synonymous with thermal cameras from cheap mobile sensors all the way up to industrial and military applications. The company first got into mobile devices with an iPhone-specific camera case and later a dongle. FLIR One came to Android a few years ago with a microUSB-equipped version, but that was right at the dawn of USB Type-C. Consequently, that first camera became obsolete quickly. Now there's a new FLIR One, actually two of them. The third-gen FLIR One costs $199 and the FLIR One Pro will run you $399.

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