Android Police

Tips & Tutorials

26

How to simultaneously use two WhatsApp numbers on your phone

How to simultaneously use two WhatsApp numbers on your phone

If you have a dual SIM phone, you already know the tremendous convenience the experience can provide. But for all the benefits, there are still apps out there that don't really recognize the dual SIM use case, like WhatsApp. Traditionally, using two WhatsApp accounts on a single smartphone wasn't really possible, but many phones now include built-in features like app cloning or work profiles that allow you to keep two instances of a single app on your device. Even if your phone doesn't have such an option, we've got other ways to work around this annoying limitation in our guide. Read on for more.

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76

How to rip your movie collection to watch anywhere

How to rip your movie collection to watch anywhere

Physical media has its time and its place, but in the era of ultra-fast home Wi-Fi and high-res smartphones and tablets, a Blu-Ray or DVD basically makes no sense for a lot of the ways we now consume content. While ripping your collection of discs to digital can be time-consuming and comes with a real cost (disk space), going through the trouble can get you something Netflix can't: permanent, go-anywhere access to your complete media collection that no one can take away.

In this guide, we'll show you how to get started ripping your DVDs and Blu-Rays, stripping the DRM protection, and converting them into more space-friendly and watchable formats for all of your devices.

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12

How to make a WhatsApp voice or video call with Google Assistant

How to make a WhatsApp voice or video call with Google Assistant

Last year, Google introduced integrations with WhatsApp that would let you start an audio or video call on the app via Assistant. While the feature is now widely available, the actual commands you need to use to utilize it are a little less than intuitive. You need to phrase things just so in order for Assistant to understand you actually want to use WhatsApp to make a call, which is mildly annoying. Fortunately, we've got a quick and easy guide to get you fluent in Google Assistant speak.

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0

How to sideload any application on Sony smart TVs

How to sideload any application on Sony smart TVs

Sony uses Android TV across all its smart TVs, which means you get a full-fledged operating system without extra boxes or streaming devices. Android TV also gives you access to the Google Play Store, a library of thousands of TV-optimized games and applications. However, sometimes the app you want might not be available through the Play Store — maybe Google hasn't approved it yet, or you want to install the latest updates before everyone else. That's where sideloading comes in.

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16

How to change your Android device's name on the Play Store, Google Assistant, and more

How to change your Android device's name on the Play Store, Google Assistant, and more

Every phone, tablet, smartwatch, TV, and other Android-powered device has a model name assigned to it by the manufacturer. The name shows up in a few different places, including the desktop Play Store website, Google Assistant, and Google's Find My Device tool. Sometimes the model name is easily recognizable (e.g. "Google Pixel 3" or "Nokia 7.2"), but in other cases, it can be an incomprehensible string of characters and numbers.

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149

The best Android power user features you may have forgotten about

The best Android power user features you may have forgotten about

With over a decade under its belt, Android has built a long history as Google's mobile operating system. And in that history are dozens of little features, changes, and updates that have added, removed, or modified aspects of that OS in subtle and not-so-subtle ways. But for every new option Google brings to Android, we're probably forgetting one that been in there for years that we've simply not bothered to use in a while. And in some cases, these are pretty genuinely useful things!

Remember you can use two fingers to swipe down for quick settings? Screen pinning? Lock screen messages?

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122

How to go back to an older version of an app on Android

How to go back to an older version of an app on Android

Sometimes, the latest version of an app isn't the best version. Bugs and issues can happen, and while rolling back to an older version can be a security risk, sometimes you just have to do it to keep things working. Once the troubleshooting basics are done and restarting your phone or "swiping away" the app from your recent list hasn't fixed things, it may be time for (slightly) more drastic measures. Here's how you can roll back to an earlier version of an app — whether it's a normal app or one of Google's new-fangled app bundles.

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12

How to see when your Google Opinion Rewards credits will expire

How to see when your Google Opinion Rewards credits will expire

If you're still a little salty about having your Opinion Rewards earnings unceremoniously obliterated in late 2019, you're not alone. The backlash prompted Google to add an explanatory banner to the Opinion Rewards app and ultimately provide a way to view when your credits will expire in the future. Here's how to keep tabs on those expiration dates so that your credits are never squandered again.

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20

How to disable autoplay in YouTube’s home and subscriptions feeds

How to disable autoplay in YouTube’s home and subscriptions feeds

YouTube’s silent autoplay feature—found in the home and subscriptions tabs—isn’t the most intuitive concept Google's ever cooked up. For starters, if a video autoplays for too long while you’re scrolling through your feed, the video gets added to your history, even if you don’t click on it. Then if you decide to watch the video at a later time, it starts right where the autoplay left off, instead of back at the beginning. These quirks alone are enough to make you want to pull the plug on autoplay altogether. Luckily, there is a way to banish it from your YouTube feeds.

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97

Amazon's Fire tablets are slow, but you can (probably) make them faster

Amazon's Fire tablets are slow, but you can (probably) make them faster

Amazon's Fire tablets are a great value, and offer an incredibly affordable way to watch movies, play games, and browse the web on a larger display than your smartphone. But they can be slow, there's no way around it. A big part of that is just the budget-level hardware Amazon powers its cheap tablets with, and unfortunately there's not much we can do about that—after all, we can't just download more RAM. But there are some steps you can take to improve things, and we legitimately think they're worth taking.

We aren't miracle workers, of course—and these steps won't turn your tablet into a high-end device—but there's a good chance you'll see a noticeable difference in performance afterwards.

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