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Articles Tagged:

webassembly

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Google Chrome Canvas PWA brings low-latency doodling to Chromebooks, Android, and even your desktop

Earlier today, our buds over at Chrome Unboxed spotted a new progressive web app by Google called Chrome Canvas. It's a very simple sketching/doodling app that works best on devices like Chromebooks with stylus-based input, but it will also run on your desktop or phone. The new app is showing up as an installed app on some Chromebooks running Dev and Canary channels, but you can pull it down manually on other devices right now.

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Firefox support for web-based Google Earth is in development

After two years in development, the web-based Google Earth 9.0 debuted earlier this year. The new version runs entirely in the web browser, but it only works in Google Chrome. This is because it used Portable Native Client (NaCl), a technology that allows C and C++ code to run in the Chrome browser. Since no other browser bothered implementing NaCl, the Earth web app was exclusive to Chrome.

That is now changing, as the Twitter account for Google Earth revealed that Firefox support is in the works:

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Chrome 57 adds Custom Tabs improvements, more search engine options, WebAssembly support, and more [APK Download]

A few days after the release of Chrome 57 for the desktop, Google has started pushing out the latest update to Android users. This time around, Chrome has more controls for Chrome Custom Tabs, the ability to add recently-visited search engines, support for WebAssembly, and more.

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Chrome Beta 57 adds WebAssembly support, improved media notifications, and more [APK Download]

Two days ago, Chrome 56 was released for Android with several major changes to both to the app itself and the web features it supports. As always, a new stable release means the next version - Chrome 57 - has entered the beta stage. Let's dig into the new features that Chrome 57 brings.

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WebAssembly is enabled by default in Chrome 58, gives web apps more processing power

Most of the interactive content you see on the web (besides Flash) is powered by JavaScript, initially created by Netscape Navigator developers in 1995. As with the rest of the internet, it has grown and changed a good deal since then, but it's not perfect. JavaScript is a high-level language, meaning basic functions like garbage collection are handled by the JavaScript VM. WebAssembly has been in the planning stages for years, as an alternative to JavaScript for low-level applications, and it is now enabled by default in Chrome Canary 58.

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