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Articles Tagged:

US

66

Pentagon blocks new Huawei trade restrictions from taking effect

Huawei's battle with the United States over trade bans is still very much alive, nearly a year after the White House initially called Huawei a security risk. Several American companies have continued to sell components to Huawei under special licenses, and now the Commerce Department and the Defense Department are sparring over more limits on Huawei trade.

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63

Sonos sues Google for patent infringement, asks for sales ban on almost all Google devices

Amazon and Google's plays for user data have pushed the battle of the virtual assistants into the living rooms, kitchens, and bedrooms via the smart speaker. Sonos, which makes a number of audio products compatible with both Alexa and Google Assistant, feels it has been squeezed by both companies of its intellectual property in the middle of this war. However, The New York Times reports the company has decided to target only Google in two federal lawsuits and has sought sales injunctions for its speakers, smartphones, and laptops.

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32

TCL previews a trio of quad-camera phones coming to the US this year

The closest thing to a phone that we could say was from TCL would be all the licensed devices throughout the years for Alcatel, BlackBerry, and Palm. This past fall, TCL produced and sold the Plex phone under its own name in Europe. Now, the company more known for its TVs in the U.S. and Canada will be bringing multiple smartphones to those countries.

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13

Huawei receives third 90-day reprieve from US trade ban (Update: Commerce Department issuing special licenses)

For the third time this year, the US Commerce Department has granted another 90-day reprieve to Huawei that lets American companies continue to do business with China's biggest telecom. The new rule takes effect on November 18th, and it follows the first extension granted in May and the second in August.

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77

Federal court ruling ends random searches of phones (and other devices) at U.S. airports and borders

Random searches of phones, laptops, and other electronic devices at airports (and other ports of entry) in the United States have increased over the past few years. In fact, the practice is so commonplace that some people choose to wipe their phones before traveling. Thankfully, a district court has decided that random searches of devices at ports of entry is unconstitutional, making the searches illegal.

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16

Google Waze-ifies transit in 6 US cities with experimental Pigeon app

Google has just opened up crowdsourcing's potential to improve our lives by just a pinch more. In addition to fueling traffic speed and accident reports on Waze and Google Maps, the company is now experimenting with user-submitted data for a real-time public transit tracker app called Pigeon. It's been tested in New York City and is now headed out to six other U.S. cities.

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10

TikTok is being investigated by the U.S. government over security and censorship concerns

TikTok has surged in popularity over the past year, becoming not just a place for music mashups, but also short memes in the spirit of Vine. However, the rise of TikTok has also piqued the interest of federal officials, who are worried that the China-owned social media network could be storing user data improperly or censoring content.

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12

LG G8X up for pre-orders from October 25 for as low as $300, but with an asterisk

If LG seems particularly out of sorts this year, you could probably tack a lot of that to its contorted phone release schedule: it announced the V50 alongside the G8, released the G8 in April and then the V50 (with its 5G-ness) in June, then decided to fill its IFA booth in September with a dual-screen remix of the G8, the G8X. Today, we're learning when that phone will go on sale in the United States.

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7

FCC approves Sprint and T-Mobile merger, states' lawsuit remains the last hurdle

The FCC has voted to approve the merger of Sprint and T-Mobile, an agency official told The Verge, with commissioners voting down party lines by a margin of 3 to 2. The two Democratic members have expressed their dissent to the $26 billion transaction announced April of last year in FCC filings and, in one particular member's case, an op-ed.

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30

Google Pay will soon take your transit passes in New York and the San Francisco Bay Area

A number of transit systems worldwide have signed contracts with fare solutions vendor Cubic to modernize their collection methods — that includes accepting contactless payment mediums like Google Pay. But for those who rely on a weekly or monthly pass to commute on the metro, they've still had to resort to a physical Oyster or Clipper or what-have-you card. Now, Cubic and Google are working together to allow Google Pay to take in transit cards.

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