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Articles Tagged:

Titan Security Key

17

Google Advanced Protection users can gift friends a free Titan security key set (and get their own free Nest Mini)

If you use a two-factor security key for your Google account, then you might know about the company's Advanced Protection Program, which enables a handful of additional security protections and restrictions. What you might not know is that if you have enabled that program on your account, you can gift a friend a Titan security key set and get a new Nest Mini for yourself, all for free.

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11

Save 15% on Google's Titan security keys from now until December 6th

As you're surfing Black Friday deals you might be considering how secure all those passwords you're entering are. If you're particularly concerned, Google's Titan security keys can beef up your accounts' security. Whether you're looking to stock up on keys or you've just been curious about trying one, now wouldn't be a bad time to give it a go: Google is offering 15% off their entire Titan range from now until December 6th of this year.

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8

Google Titan Security Key now available in Canada, France, Japan, and the UK

Google's two-factor authentication hardware key, the Titan Security, has been available in the US for almost a year. After disappearing from the Store for a few months and a Bluetooth flaw that required Google to send free replacements, it's now making its way to four other countries.

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12

Google finds flaw in Bluetooth Titan Security Keys, will provide free replacements

Google released the Titan Security Key last year, as part of the company's growing focus on two-factor authentication. The kit comes with a USB Type-A key and a battery-powered Bluetooth/NFC key, and both could be configured as 2FA methods with Google accounts. The last thing you want in your security key is a security flaw, but that's just what has been discovered.

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26

Titan Security Key no longer available from the Google Store

For years, Google has been on a mission to make sure you're the only one that can access your online accounts. The company released the Titan Security Key Bundle last year, as a two-factor authentication key for Google accounts (as well as any other FIDO U2F-compatible service). However, the key may have been discontinued, as the Google Store page now says "No longer available."

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49

Google Titan Security Key review: A $50 hardware 2FA bundle with outdated connectors

Those of us that care about our online security probably use some form of two-factor authentication to secure our most important accounts, but even the strongest password and the longest authentication code are still subject to something as simple as a phishing attack, which is why so many have switched to hardware security keys. Google helped to create the Universal 2nd Factor (U2F) hardware authentication standard, and now it's releasing its own product to consumers: the $50 Titan Security Key.

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65

Google's hardware 2FA Titan Security Keys available starting today for $50 at the Google Store

If you're conscious of your own digital security in the modern era, then odds are you use two/multi-factor authentication to secure your more important accounts, but not all methods are equal. If you're especially concerned about privacy or in a "high value" position, in security terms, hardware-based keys are the better choice, as they offer additional protections against things like phishing attacks. And starting today, those invested heavily into Google's ecosystem can pick up the previously announced Titan Security Keys over on the Google Store.

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69

Google to sell its own hardware 2FA solution, the Titan Security Key

Google is in full-on enterprise announcement mode, today being the second of three days dedicated to its business-centric Cloud Next conference. One interesting tidbit that's been making the rounds (independently of an announcement at the event itself, so far) is some new security hardware Google plans on selling in its store. This isn't anything so glamorous as a new phone, tablet, or Chromebook, though: They're a pair of hardware 2FA security keys.

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