Android Police

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survey

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Over Two-Thirds Of Smartphones In The US Run Android Or iOS

A recent report from ComScore indicates that as of July 2011 82 million Americans own smartphones, with Android running on 41.8% of those devices, iOS on 27%, BlackBerry OS on 21.7%, Windows Phone on 5.7%, and Symbian on 1.9%.

The survey clearly indicates that significant gains have been made by Google and Apple at the expense of RIM, Microsoft, and Nokia.

Screen shot 2011-08-31 at PM 05.44.47

Additionally, the survey also looked at the market share of hardware manufacturers and interestingly Samsung was well ahead of the rest with 25.5% market share.

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Although Android Holds 39 Percent Of Operating System Market, Apple Is Still The Most Popular Manufacturer

Latest data from Nielsen indicates that Google's Android's OS claims the largest share of the U.S. smartphone market with a total of 39%. However, this market share is split between HTC (14%), Motorola (11%), Samsung (8%) and other Android hardware manufacturers (6%).

nielsen-smartphone-share-7-11

In contrast, Apple's iOS now commands 28% of the market which is well short of Android's 39%, but what is interesting is that because Apple is the only manufacturer making iOS devices it is the leading smartphone manufacturer in the U.S.

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Nielsen: Android Runs On 37% Of All US Smartphones And 50% Of All New Smartphones Sold

NielsenWire has released yet another one of their bar and pie chart-filled smartphone surveys for the US this morning, and it's just more good news for Android. Here's a quick breakdown of some of the key stats Nielsen compiled:

  • Android now represents 37% of all US smartphones
  • 50% of smartphones sold in the month of March were Android phones
  • 31% of consumers said their next purchase will be an Android phone, compared to 26% one year ago.
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Business Insider Publishes Results Of Smartphone Survey: Android Dominates, And Lots Of People Hate Apple

If you're a frequent reader, you may remember hearing about the Business Insider Smartphone Survey, which we called out for its biased title and questions. As promised, they have posted the results, and much as we expected, Android absolutely dominated.

  • 51.4% of respondents use an Android device (versus 33% for iPhone).
  • 54.4% said their next smartphone purchase would be an Android device, compared to a (still impressive) 33.6% for the iPhone.
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Follow Up: Business Insider Closes Smartphone Survey, Starts A (Nearly) Identical One With A Less Moronic Name

Over the weekend, we posted about a pant-crappingly stupid (and biased) survey posted by Silicon Alley Insider called "WHY WOULD ANYONE EVER BUY AN ANDROID PHONE? Take Our Smartphone Survey And Tell Us!" A few dozen of you posted in the comments to criticize just how biased SAI was with the survey, and a large number of you followed through to take it.

It looks like they may have realized the faux pas - to an extent, anyway - as they closed that one down (without tabulating the results) and reopened a new one.

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Business Insider Wants To Know Why Anyone Would Ever Buy An Android Phone; Let's Show Them.

Silicon Alley Insider - the Tech section of Business Insider - posted a survey this weekend under the headline "WHY WOULD ANYONE EVER BUY AN ANDROID PHONE? Take Our Smartphone Survey And Tell Us!" Eye-catching, to say the least. The survey is 12 questions, and asks what phone (OS) you use, what your next one will use, and so on... it's all fairly standard.

The results of the survey aren't immediately available, but the site promises to publish them in a few days.

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New Survey Says Consumers Want Tablets, Android Has High Brand Loyalty But Low Brand Recognition, And Bigger Is Better

Sybase (owned by SAP) commissioned a survey on tablets, and the results are rather surprising. Before I dig in, however, I feel it's only fair to point out what I perceive as a flaw in the survey: they provide minimal information on the survey questions and how it was conducted. As a result, it's hard to tell whether the survey was free of bias; based on how the results are presented with bias, I'm guessing not.

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