Android Police

Articles Tagged:

suit

42

Qualcomm will now have to license standards-essential patents to competitors on reasonable terms

Last year, the FTC filed suit against Qualcomm for its patent licensing, alleging that the company wasn't giving competitors fair terms for standards-essential patents owned by the company. In what will likely prove to be a benefit to companies and consumers alike, yesterday the judge in the suit granted a motion for partial summary judgment, requiring that Qualcomm license those standards-essential patents to other chipset manufacturers under reasonable terms.

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96

The Federal Trade Commission Sues AT&T For Throttling 3.5 Million Unlimited Data Customers: 'Unlimited Means Unlimited'

AT&T unlimited data users, your champion has arrived. Today the United States Federal Trade Commission announced that it has filed a federal court complaint against AT&T Wireless, alleging that the company misled customers by offering "unlimited" cellular data service that was severely reduced in speed at some times and places. The FTC's complaint takes issue with AT&T's failure to inform customers that the unlimited data they were paying for could be "throttled," often cutting data speeds to specific customers by up to 90 percent.

FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez pulled no punches in accusing AT&T of deceptive advertising and violation of the FTC Act:

AT&T promised its customers ‘unlimited’ data, and in many instances, it has failed to deliver on that promise.

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23

T-Mobile USA Sues Huawei For Allegedly Stealing Parts For A Phone-Testing Robot

Nine out of ten times when we report on a lawsuit, it has something to do with patents or trademarks. I'll admit that those posts can get a little dull, but they're important for the world of consumer electronics. If you've been waiting for something a little juicier in your tech legal news, have we got a story for you. The Seattle Times reports that American cellular carrier T-Mobile is suing Huawei, a giant provider of telecom infrastructure hardware and currently the third-biggest manufacturer of phones on the planet, for stealing a robot.

Specifically, for stealing the design and at least some parts of "Tappy," a custom-built robot that T-Mobile USA uses for stress testing new cell phones.

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17

Supreme Court's Ruling In Favor Of Broadcasters May Be A Death Blow To Aereo Mobile TV Service

Well, it was fun while it lasted. In a conclusion to court cases that have been going around the country ever since the service started in 2012, the US Supreme Court ruled this morning that Aereo TV is in active violation of copyright law. The decision in favor of television and cable broadcasters and their corporate backers will effectively cripple the web and mobile streaming TV service, and may destroy the company altogether.

nexusae0_Screenshot_2013-10-23-20-26-15 nexusae0_Screenshot_2013-10-23-21-20-57 nexusae0_Screenshot_2013-10-23-21-21-34

Aereo TV collects local television signals via individual digital antennas and streams the output to its customers in supported areas, effectively delivering local TV over the Internet to computers and mobile devices, including Android.

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29

Samsung Adds iPhone 5 To Lawsuit Complaint: The Patent Wars Are Far From Over

nexusae0_iphone5_thumbIf you hate to read these stories, imagine how much we hate to write them: yet another volley has been tossed in the patent battle between Samsung and Apple. This time it's the Korean manufacturer taking its intellectual property guns out against Apple, claiming that the shiny new iPhone 5 violates eight of its software patents.iphone 5 gavel

Samsung claims six utility patents and two standard essential patents. The later (USPTO filings 7,551,596 and 7,756,087) have to do with data transfers on mobile networks, while the former (USPTO 7,672,470, 7,577,757, 7,232,058, 6,292,179, 6,226,449, and 5,579,239) are more varied, ranging from audio streaming and control to keyboard and voice inputs.

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50

Documents Reveal That Apple Asked Samsung For Up To $30 Per Phone And $40 Per Tablet For Patent Licenses

As most of our readers are surely aware, the Apple vs Samsung case is still boiling, and over the course of nearly two weeks since the trial's beginning, document after document has revealed juicy details from both sides regarding previously unreleased designs, plans, and even sales figures. While so far we've avoided piecemeal coverage of the case's twists and turns, a new development (reported earlier this evening by The Verge) reveals something particularly interesting.

applesamsungslide01

We've known for some time that Apple attempted to sell Samsung on patent licensing back in 2010, but according to a document released today (and the testimony of Apple Exec Boris Teksler), Apple had proposed specific dollar figures per license – up to $30 per Phone and $40 per tablet, to which (according to Apple's slide deck) "Samsung should respond favorably." According to the proposal, Samsung would be responsible for a base rate of $30 per touchscreen phone (including phones running Android, Windows, Symbian, and Bada) and $40 per tablet (which would decrease to just $30 over two years).

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16

Apple Opted Not To Delay Samsung Galaxy S III Launch... So That The Case Goes To Trial Sooner

According to the always sometimes occasionally reliable FOSS patents, Apple made a conscious decision to allow Samsung to launch the Galaxy S III on time... so that the case could go to trial sooner. Apple had the option of filing a temporary restraining order to potentially stop the shipment of the SGSIII, but doing so would've been a risk for a few reasons.

Because Apple and Samsung are still in litigation over the Galaxy Nexus, Apple could attempt to stop shipment of the GSIII using a temporary restraining order (TRO). In order for the TRO to be granted, Apple would have to prove that there aren't enough technical differences between the two phones; consequently, by their logic, the GSIII should be tied up as well.

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14

Judge Decides Apple Doesn't Really Need All The Android Development Details, Tells Apple To Make Request Less Vague And Broad

Two weeks ago, the judge in Apple's case against Motorola ordered Google and Moto to hand over details on Android development. Naturally, Motorola appealed, and managed to change Judge Posner's mind. While the company isn't getting away scot-free (or at least, not yet), he did say that "[Apple's] motion is vague and overbroad and Motorola's objections are persuasive." In other words, Apple needs to tone down their request and make sure things are relevant and specific (or in my words, "Apple needs to stop requesting all the shit they can think of").

Presumably from here Apple will try to narrow things down as little as possible to get the request to hold, at which point Motorola will appeal it and both sides will hope for the best (before doing it all over).

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69

Apple Still Trying To Sue The World Into Oblivion With A Fresh Suit Against 17 Samsung Devices Infringing Upon 8 Apple Patents; In Other News, Sky Blue, Water Wet

Last week, we found out that Apple was bringing a fresh suit against Samsung - specifically, seeking a preliminary injunction against the Galaxy Nexus over four patents. Now the official complaint document has been posted by the court, and it turns out the suit is aimed at a lot more than just the beloved GNex, and involves more than the four patents initially mentioned. In fact, Apple explicitly names seventeen Samsung devices and cites eight of its patents.

The patents in question:

2012-02-16 08h42_36

Or, for those of you that prefer things in text (also, so that you can copy and paste them elsewhere for the purpose of mockery):

  • System and method for performing an action on a structure in computer-generated data
  • Universal interface for retrieval of information in a computer system
  • Unlocking a device by performing gestures on an unlock image
  • Method, system, and graphical user interface for providing word recommendations
  • Missed telephone call management for a portable multifunction device
  • Graphical user interface using historical lists with field classes
  • Asynchronous data synchronization amongst devices
  • Universal interface for retrieval of information in a computer system

The 17(+) devices in question:

2012-02-16 08h52_52

  • Phones
    • US SGSII series: Galaxy S II Skyrocket, Galaxy S II Epic 4G Touch, Galaxy S II - T-Mobile, Galaxy S II - AT&T
    • Galaxy Nexus
    • Illusion
    • Captivate Glide
    • Exhibit II 4G
    • Stratosphere
    • Transform Ultra
    • Admire
    • Conquer 4G
    • Dart
  • Media Players/Tablets
    • Galaxy Player 4.0 and 5.0
    • Galaxy Tab 7.0 Plus and Galaxy Tab 8.9

sam_vs_apple

I CAN SEE THE INFRINGEMENT FROM HERE.

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43

Apple Seeks Preliminary Injunction Against Galaxy Nexus In U.S. Based On The "Four Horsemen" Of Patents

Apple is at it again, bringing a motion for preliminary injunction against Samsung's Galaxy Nexus in the United States Thursday. The motion is based on a handful of powerful patents, which FOSS Patents has labeled "the patent equivalent of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse." Here's FOSS' breakdown:

 

  1. the "data tapping" patent based on which the ITC ordered an import ban against HTC

  2. a patent related to Siri and unified search, which must be of huge concern to Google with a view to its core business

  3. a new slide-to-unlock patent that even had the head of the Taiwanese government profoundly worried

  4. a word completion patent that provides major speed improvements for touchscreen text entry

Three of the above patents were apparently granted only recently (after September 2011), while the "data tapping" patent may sound familiar to those who followed Apple's case to the ITC against HTC.

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