Android Police

Articles Tagged:

streaming tv

102

YouTube TV retains most Fox regional sports networks, drops NY and LA channels (Updated)

Google and Fox Regional Sports networks owner Sinclair Broadcast Group have agreed to a new carriage deal that will see 19 local sports channels across the nation remain on the YouTube TV lineup. There are major omissions, though, as the YES Network in New York and Los Angeles-based Fox Sports West and Prime Ticket will be cut loose, effective today.

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25

AT&T TV streaming service and its custom Android TV box now available nationwide

AT&T started testing its new streaming TV service in a few markets last year, but now you can sign up anyplace in the US. AT&T TV includes dozens of channels split up into multiple service tiers, and there's a custom Android TV box to access it all. However, AT&T is running this offering more like a traditional cable subscription than a modern streaming service. That means contracts and price bumps.

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31

TiVo introduces the TiVo Stream 4K powered by Android TV

TiVo first made a name for itself in the late 90's when the company introduced a revolutionary digital video recording device that automatically saved TV shows for viewing later. Since then, TiVo has steadily dipped its toes into various products and services, like live TV via TiVo Online, TiVo Cast for streaming videos, and more. This decade, TiVo is branching out with a Sling-connected content streaming device powered by Android TV.

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3

Sling TV simplifies access to free content on Android and Amazon Fire devices, no credit card required

Sling TV is an over-the-top (OTT) internet television app that streams live cable TV to an extensive list of devices. After bestowing Roku users the ability to watch free content earlier this year, Sling TV is rolling out the same feature to all Android and Amazon Fire device users starting today.

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18

T-Mobile describes upcoming à la carte streaming service, with options costing around $5-8

T-Mobile revealed some more info about its upcoming plans to enter the streaming TV market during an earnings call earlier today. In the Q&A section of the call, T-Mobile president Mike Sievert discussed the company's two-pronged approach to the concept via both home and mobile, illuminating both the potential costs envisioned and a much more fractured, effectively build-your-own service compared to current "skinny" bundles.

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47

AT&T's $15/month WatchTV streaming service is now open to all

AT&T surprise-announced WatchTV, its $15-a-month Sling TV competitor, in April. Earlier this month, the service went live for subscribers on certain AT&T plans. Now, it's available to everybody, and if you're in the market for an alternative to a basic cable package, it's actually looking like a pretty good option.

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22

Sling TV gets more expensive, adds à la carte channels and free content

Sling TV announced a number of changes yesterday. Strangely, it seems people who don't subscribe to the service stand to benefit the most. While the price of a basic package has gone up by five bucks a month, from $20 to $25, the company has introduced free content for non-subscribers, as well as à la carte channel selections and additional on-demand programming that don't require subscriptions.

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InBrief
12

Starz is now available on YouTube TV for $9 a month

3

Google Play Movies v4.3 prepares configuration options for streaming services [APK Teardown]

Google recently launched a new feature that suggests various streaming services when you're looking at TV shows and movies to watch. The latest update doesn't appear to do any more than ensure that feature is available, assuming it hadn't already rolled out to you. However, it looks like there's still a little more to come. It looks like we'll also get the option to configure those streaming services and cable subscriptions to get better suggestions.

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44

[Update: App is available] Time Warner will offer classic cartoon addicts an ad-free Boomerang subscription for $5 a month this spring

If were lucky enough to have cable TV back in the 90s (and you were around the right age and/or state of mind) you probably remember countless hours of Cartoon Network. The fledgling channel was nothing less than a classical education in the golden age of Looney Tunes and Hanna-Barbera shows. Eventually Cartoon Network filled up with its own original programming, but the classic shorts and Saturday morning cartoons moved over to a sister channel, Boomerang, which is still showing off the good stuff. Cord cutters don't get access to Boomerang, but that's about to change.

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