Android Police

Articles Tagged:

ssl

51

Many websites will stop working on older Android versions in 2021

Many websites will stop working on older Android versions in 2021

It took a long time, but most of the web now uses HTTPS to securely transmit information, partially thanks to a push by Google. However, this does mean that many websites could encounter issues (or fail to load entirely) if the proper certificates aren't installed on your device, which is exactly what will happen to older Android devices next year.

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InBrief
12
Google's forced SSL search page, encrypted.google.com, is shutting down

Google's forced SSL search page, encrypted.google.com, is shutting down

25

Chrome 62 will mark all HTTP pages with data entry fields as "Not Secure"

Chrome 62 will mark all HTTP pages with data entry fields as "Not Secure"

Google has been planning to mark all HTTP sites as non-secure in Chrome for a while now, but the company is taking baby steps to ensure users (and owners of HTTP-only sites) don't freak out. Chrome already identifies HTTP sites with password or credit card fields as "Not Secure" in the address bar, and Chrome 62 will expand that to any HTTP site with any data entry fields.

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35

Chrome 58 improves Custom Tabs and Progressive Web Apps, breaks sites using certain HTTPS certificates, and more [APK Download]

Chrome 58 improves Custom Tabs and Progressive Web Apps, breaks sites using certain HTTPS certificates, and more [APK Download]

Chrome 58 was just released on the desktop a few days ago, and in speedier fashion than usual, Chrome 58 for Android is now available. This update focuses on improvements to Chrome Custom Tabs and Progressive Web Apps, includes dozens of minor improvements, and blocks HTTPS/SSL certificates from certain certificate providers.

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29
[New App] Bluebox Heartbleed Scanner Can Help You Discover An OpenSSL Vulnerability On Your Device

[New App] Bluebox Heartbleed Scanner Can Help You Discover An OpenSSL Vulnerability On Your Device

The Internet has been abuzz over the recently discovered Heartbleed bug. If you're not already familiar, Heartbleed is a vulnerability in the OpenSSL software library that allows an attacker to steal data directly from the memory space of an application and learn the private keys used to keep data securely encrypted as it travels over the Internet. The implications of this kind of leak are certainly severe, and it has everybody rushing to either install updates that fix the bug or implement workarounds to disable it.

As users, there's not a lot you can do to close this security hole on your device, but you might still want to know if you're vulnerable.

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