Android Police

Articles Tagged:

software

82

What We Use, 2018 Edition: The stuff Rita can't live without

It's been four years since I shared with you all the gadgets and quirky things that I own and love in my previous What We Use post. In the time since, a lot has changed in my personal life. I met the most awesome, weird, and pun-loving man. We got married, moved into an apartment of our own, and started traveling a little more frequently.

But a lot is still the same. I still pull double work duties: I own and manage my pharmacy, and I work here at Android Police, obviously. In between selling drugs and counseling patients, I sit back at my desk, clean up hundreds of emails a day, write a few posts, virtually shout at the entire team if they miss an Oxford comma, and come up with silly or inappropriate jokes.

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90

Samsung's new gesture navigation solution actually looks quite promising

Gesture navigation is considered by some to be an important innovation in smartphone UX, not least because it removes the nav bar and allows for more content on the display. It's not easy to get it right, but Apple has done a pretty good job of it and Android OEMs like OnePlus have also had a good go (let's not waste our time discussing Google's Pixel abomination). Samsung's recently announced Galaxy A7 offers another new take on gesture nav, and it actually seems pretty good.

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110

OnePlus Software Maintenance Schedule promises two years of software updates and three years of security patches

In the last few years, OnePlus has gotten serious about keeping its devices updated. While it can feel like stable OxygenOS releases take a while sometimes, the Open Beta program represents what OEMs should do: give those who are willing early access to new features, Android versions, and so on. Further attempting to bolster its positive reputation in this area, OnePlus released the Software Maintenance Schedule, which promises two years of software and three years of security releases for each device and it's already in effect.

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72

LG shows off V30 software features in new video

One of the more exciting announcements at IFA in Berlin was the LG V30, the company's second flagship of the year. Much like the Galaxy Note8 with the Galaxy S8, the V30 is mostly a refined version of the LG G6 with a few additional features. LG has now uploaded a video showing off the phone's software enhancements.

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199

Google explains the software that makes the Pixel's camera so impressive

The Pixel's review embargo just lifted earlier today, and reviewers have been very impressed with both the speed of the phone's 12.3MP shooter and the quality that its images capture. In his review of the Pixel, David said it has "the best smartphone camera on the market." Marc Levoy, the lead of a computational photography team at Google Research, discussed with The Verge just how much the software assists in making the Pixel's camera so damn good.

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70

Huawei is reportedly working on its own mobile OS as a 'contingency measure'

Huawei is working toward making its Android software more palatable for a western audience before it goes all-in on the US market, but that's not the only mobile project the Chinese OEM is undertaking. The Information reports that Huawei is also running a secret project to build its own mobile operating system as a hedge against Android. The new EMUI software layer is expected this fall, but the mobile OS might never see the light of day.

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20

AT&T Buys Software Rights And Acquires Some Staff From Carrier iQ (Yes, That Carrier iQ)

Do you remember the huge scandal that was Carrier iQ? It's alright if you don't - it's been over four years since the company's data-logging mobile phone software was revealed, resulting in accusations of privacy violations, lax security, lawsuits both from and against the software maker and its partners, and eventually the removal of Carrier iQ code from phones via security patches. The months-long scandal basically killed Carrier iQ as a company... but now its corporate assets are owned by a carrier jokingly referred to as "the Death Star." There's no way that can go wrong, is there?

Yes, AT&T, in between attempts to snap up competing telcos and the country's biggest satellite TV provider, has somehow found time to buy a tiny but incredibly controversial software developer.

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12

Google OnHub OTA Update Adds A Few Tweaks For Improved Performance

The OnHub router has quickly become an interesting novelty in the sometimes stoic home networking segment thanks to its forward-looking hardware and user-focused software. And Google isn't letting up on the latter: the router is already receiving its first software update, about three months after the launch of the TP Link-branded OnHub and just a week after the announcement of the ASUS version.

That being said, there isn't anything in this update that's particularly mind-blowing. According to the changelog posted on a Google support page and corroborated by an owner on Google+, the changes are focused on better performance and network management.

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43

What We Use 2014: The Stuff Michael Can't Live Without

Howdy. The name's Michael Crider, and I hope you've noticed that I've been hanging around here for the last year or so. I'm a web writer and general geek, born in Texas and now living in Colorado Springs. How I came to work for Android Police over the last 12 months (or possibly a bit longer) is a long and boring story.

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Here are the bullet points you need to get context on the following exploration of my stuff: my dad was a computer engineer who worked for General Dynamics and Lockheed back in the 80s, and so I've been surrounded by varying bits of technology for essentially my entire life.

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106

What We Use 2014: The Stuff Rita Can’t Live Without

I love gadgets. I remember wandering around the electronics store, checking the specs on every portable radio cassette player, and drooling over an Aiwa one that could play both sides of the tape without requiring manual flipping. I was also the 14-year-old girl who went to the computer shop and had a list of every spec she wanted in her first computer.

Now in my (very) late twenties, that passion hasn't subsided. I still love these pieces of plastic and metal. I read about them, try them when I can, buy them when it's justifiable, tinker with them, and it led me to write about them.

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