Android Police

Articles Tagged:

server-side

47

YouTube Music finally gets gapless playback through server-side rollout

If you regularly use YouTube Music to experience songs, either through just the audio or with the accompanying music video, you might have lamented on its inability to properly playback songs with seamless transitions. That sucks if you're trying to sink into a full, continuous LP like Pink Floyd's "The Dark Side of the Moon." But some users are now reporting that the app is starting to do so in what appears to be a server-side feature rollout.

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33

You can now see which of your contacts are often on Duo before calling them

Hot on the heels of implementing a dark mode with v63, a new version of Google Duo is rolling out now with a few minor changes. Chief among them is the ability to see which contacts are most active on the platform before calling them or sending them a message.

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17

Dark mode comes to Google Duo on Android

Another day, another Google app getting a dark mode. Today's honors go to Google Duo, which appears to have received its splash of dark via a server-side switch — the app's latest update rolled out a few days ago, but it didn't have the theme back then.

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35

[Update: Rolling out to all] Google Docs, Sheets, Slides get refreshed Material Design UI [APK Downloads]

The switch from Holo to Material Design in Google's own software took years, even if the company had fewer apps to worry about updating back then. In contrast, the move to the new Google Material Theme look is swifter, with many of Google's apps already updated with the design and a few more still waiting their turn. Among the latter are Google's standalone apps for Docs, Sheets, and Slides, even if their parent Drive app has already had it for a few months. But now, Docs appears to be the first app among its brethren to get a taste of the new UI.

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60

[Update: Rolling out] Google tests a more compact Discover feed design with no topic bubbles

It's been over a year since Google started testing topic bubbles in the then-called-Feed, and many months since that design rolled out as part of the rebranded Discover. In the time since, we haven't noticed any major changes in the interface and we had almost started believing that server-side tests may have stopped on the app. But no, they've been resurrected (perhaps they never even died?) and are back now thanks to a new Discover that sheds off its signature topic bubbles.

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51

[Update: Rolling out] Google Maps to improve the Local Guides contribution process

If you're an avid Google Maps Local Guide, or even a beginner, you've probably noticed that the app helps you figure out what to review and which photos to upload. The Your contributions section has plenty of suggestions, but the interface is a little confusing. Pending ratings and reviews are on the main page, but suggested photo uploads are accessible from a separate banner, and there's no easy way to go back and add more info to what you've already submitted. Maps is working on improving all of this.

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37

Play Store is testing a more easily accessible wishlist button

On any given day, there are at least a dozen variations of the Play Store interface showing up for users across the world. Even on the same device, with the same account, and without any update, the Store might flip from one look to the other in a few seconds without warning. Most recently, simultaneous downloads showed up, but today we're talking about a more minor change, but one that's neat nonetheless: a more reachable wishlist button.

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104

Spotify made the worst possible adaptive icon for Android

It's been two years since Android O introduced adaptive icons, and many apps and developers have yet to get with the program. You look at your homescreen and app drawer and realize that even though you're using a circular or square or teardrop mask, some apps keep whatever icon shape they wanted. Until recently, Spotify was one of those. Now the app is rolling out an adaptive icon and it's... exactly what we don't want.

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30

Google Maps adds traffic slowdowns to incident reporting

For years, Google Maps users begged the navigation service to borrow the incident reporting feature from its peer down the virtual hallway, Waze. But it wasn't until last November that we got a sneak peek at the new option, then a month later, it popped up for many more users. It didn't work at first, was briefly removed, then returned in a functional state. The Maps team isn't content with just crash and speed trap reports, it has recently added a new type of incidents: slowdowns.

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