Android Police

Articles Tagged:

security

45

Researchers finally discover how Android malware that could survive factory resets works

Researchers finally discover how Android malware that could survive factory resets works

Earlier this year, a story made the rounds about a new kind of malware afflicting Android handsets. But it was this malware's pernicious nature that really made headlines, as it could even survive complete factory resets on afflicted phones. This insidious malware was named xHelper. At the time, we didn't know how it managed this impressive (but scary) achievement, but security researchers at Kaspersky have since dug into its inner workings, revealing an incredibly sophisticated system that installs itself to an Android phone's system partition, and even changes how the system works to prevent it from being "easily" removed.

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1

Ecobee launches Haven security subscription alongside Alexa SmartCamera

Ecobee launches Haven security subscription alongside Alexa SmartCamera

Ecobee is mostly known for its smart thermostat, but the company has decided to foray into an adjacent business field: home security. It has announced its new Haven subscription that takes advantage of existing SmartThermostats and SmartSensors and introduced its first security camera and sensors for doors and windows.

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4

Play Store app policy changes go after misleading subscriptions, prep for Android 11 location permissions

Play Store app policy changes go after misleading subscriptions, prep for Android 11 location permissions

The Play Store has a problem with sleazy apps that overcharge customers for basic functionality via subscriptions. A lot of people often don't even realize that they're signing up for expensive plans due to apps highlighting free trials, conveniently concealing that they automatically turn into paid subscriptions. To combat these frauds, Google will instate new Play Store policies that force developers to disclose exactly how much and what for they're charging starting June 16 while the company will also send out emails warning customers before trials turn into paid subscriptions. The updated policies additionally prepare a change for location permissions in Android 11 — developers have to get approval from Google before they're allowed to access background location.

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1

Keep an eye on your house and yard for $276 with this eufyCam 2 two-camera bundle ($74 off)

Keep an eye on your house and yard for $276 with this eufyCam 2 two-camera bundle ($74 off)

If you're on the market for a wireless security camera system to keep an eye on your home and your yard without breaking the bank, the Anker eufyCam 2 is an excellent option. With this deal, you can snatch a two-camera bundle for $276, which is $76 off the regular price.

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6

Ring will require two-factor authentication starting today (Update: Blink verifying emails)

Ring will require two-factor authentication starting today (Update: Blink verifying emails)

Ring has dealt with its fair share of privacy snafus (and then some), but its latest move might allay some of your fears. The Amazon-owned smart home company has instituted a new login policy, effective immediately. Now, you'll need to enter a two-factor authentication (2FA) code every time you log into your account.

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3

Arlo to require two-factor authentication logins later this year, in line with Nest and Ring

Arlo to require two-factor authentication logins later this year, in line with Nest and Ring

Smart security company Arlo is finally joining the ranks of Amazon's Ring and Google's Nest in requiring users of its products to go through two-step verification in order to authenticate access to their account. But when it comes to options for that second step, they may tally up a bit short for some people.

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8

T-Mobile is notifying some customers it suffered (another) data breach, financial data may be included

T-Mobile is notifying some customers it suffered (another) data breach, financial data may be included

In what sadly seems to be a yearly trend for the company, T-Mobile is announcing that it has suffered another data breach. The company was able to shut down the attack, seemingly while it was in process, and it is sending notifications to customers whose data may have been affected. Unfortunately, it isn't clear what customer information may have been leaked. One notice states that financial information wasn't affected, while another claims that it was.

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22

MediaTek security vulnerability allowed root access on devices from Nokia, Amazon, BLU, Sony, ZTE, and others

MediaTek security vulnerability allowed root access on devices from Nokia, Amazon, BLU, Sony, ZTE, and others

Security vulnerabilities are unfortunately extremely common in smartphones, given the complexity and varying codebases of most devices. That's why Google has been releasing monthly security patches for years, and if you needed another reason for why those updates are so important, the March 2020 release fixes a critical flaw on many MediaTek devices.

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10

Wi-Fi vulnerability affecting WPA2 encryption makes older Android phones insecure

Wi-Fi vulnerability affecting WPA2 encryption makes older Android phones insecure

These days, most people connect to the internet via Wi-Fi. We've been taught that on unprotected, open hotspots, you can easily be followed around the web, but generally, we would assume that password-protected networks are relatively safe from outside attacks. As it turns out, a vulnerability in the widely used Wi-Fi protected access 2 (WPA2) protocol lets hackers view unencrypted connections on these networks, even if they don't know the password. Patches are already rolling out to current routers and client devices, leaving only older, unsupported hardware indefinitely affected.

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42

FCC reportedly fining AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon at least $200 million for selling location data

FCC reportedly fining AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon at least $200 million for selling location data

The nation's big four carriers felt free to broker their customers' cellphone location data to third parties for years in order to make an easy secondhand buck off of the people who already pay them to deliver expensive wireless internet to their expensive devices. Turns out that the FCC isn't happy with their behavior and, according to Reuters's sources, may be prepared to levy an eight-digit fine against the networks.

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