Android Police

Articles Tagged:

security

36

BlueFrag security vulnerability allows code execution over Bluetooth on some Android devices

The importance of receiving Android's monthly security updates cannot be overstated. If you need another example for why that is, look no further than CVE-2020-0022 — a new vulnerability that allows code execution over Bluetooth connections on some Android devices.

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38

Some Google Photos videos ended up in random strangers’ backup archives

Google Photos is an incredibly powerful platform that makes your archive of photos and videos searchable and easily accessible anywhere you have internet. Since all files sit on Google servers, you have to trust the company to do its due diligence to protect your data, but it looks like a mishap occurred last November. Google has started sending out emails informing some users that during a short period, some backed up videos were accidentally added to other people's Google Takeout archives.

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1

You can now use Arlo Pro 3 and Ultra cameras with older base stations

Arlo Cameras are amongst the most popular ones on the market, mainly thanks to the advanced features they offer. Unfortunately, some improvements released over time require you to buy new cameras, as the new upgrades require new hardware. A good example is the Arlo Pro 3, which featured a higher resolution than its predecessor, but wasn't compatible with the Pro 2's base station. This meant you needed to buy a whole new kit if you wanted to enjoy the new camera's features. Thankfully, Arlo CEO Matthew McRae announced the company is fixing this issue as it's bringing backward compatibility to its base stations.

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20

You can now enroll in Google's Advanced Protection Program using just your phone, no backup key required

The Advanced Protection Program is arguably the best way to secure access to all of your documents and information you've stored in your Google account. Until now, though, you were required to consign two security keys in order to get those extra safety measures and only one of them could be an Android phone. Those requirements seem to have changed today as Google has started allowing iOS devices to act as keys and letting users enroll into the program with just their mobile device, no backup key needed.

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51

Chrome wants to kill browser user agent strings, cites compatibility and privacy concerns

The user agent string is the part of the browser that identifies itself to websites. It tells sites the browser and browser version number you are using, as well as limited information about your device. However, it has become an ever-growing problem for both users and developers over the past decade, so Google wants to switch to something else.

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50

Your carrier will let basically any competent criminal hijack your phone number

One of the key pieces to our digital identities, whether we like it or not, is our mobile phone number. You likely use it one way or another in a two-factor authentication login (you shouldn't). Thing is, as it's been demonstrated quite a few times, they can be easily hijacked in a few easy steps by malicious actors ringing up carriers' customer service representatives — many of whom are all too understanding in helping users out of what's supposedly a stressful situation. So, just how easy is it to steal someone's phone number on a prepaid network? Researchers at Princeton University say extremely so in a recently published whitepaper draft.

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34

Ring fired multiple employees over the last four years for accessing customers' videos

According to a report by Vice's Motherboard, Ring has fired a handful of its employees over the last four years for "improperly" accessing customer's recorded videos. This news follows a string of negative press for the Amazon-owned company, including a string of hacks, the revelation that some location and video data was being publicly shared through Ring's Neighbors app, and (justified) accusations that Ring lacked in "basic security features" to protect customer privacy and data.

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8

Mozilla patches zero-day exploit for Firefox desktop and Android browsers (APK Download)

Mozilla has patched a zero-day exploit in late revisions to Firefox 72 and version 68 of the Android web browser. In a security advisory, the company said that it was made aware of "targeted attacks in the wild abusing this flaw."

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0

The Arlo Pro 3 two-camera kit is down to $427 ($80 off)

Arlo cameras are amongst the most popular ones thanks to their reliability. Unfortunately, they're not cheap, but with this deal, you'll be able to get a two-camera kit for $427 on Amazon, which is 15% less than the MSRP.

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19

Google’s adjusted 90-day Project Zero policy gives developers more time to deploy patches

Google announced Project Zero back in 2014 in a quest to make the internet more secure by researching software exploits and informing affected developers about them. The company soon adopted a 90-days public disclosure deadline in order to speed up the patching process. In 2020, this policy will change just a little bit. Previously, vulnerabilities were published as soon as developers fixed them, but now, Google will always wait the full 90 days until it reports to the public. That's meant to ensure that patches have rolled out to more users before potential bad actors know about the exploits, thus leaving fewer people vulnerable.

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