Android Police

Articles Tagged:

security

26

Twitter can finally do two-factor authentication without SMS

In this age of data breaches and keylogging malware, passwords might not be enough to secure your accounts. That's where two-factor authentication (2FA) comes into play. These single-use codes can keep your data safe, but not all services support 2FA in the standard way. Case in point, Twitter sends a text message for 2FA codes even after you set up an authentication app. So annoying, but you can finally turn SMS off.

Read More
56

Cryptocurrency mining malware "Loapi" capable of physically damaging phones

Researchers at Kaspersky Lab have identified a family of modular Android malware dubbed "Loapi," which is capable of mining the Monero cryptocurrency, inundating users with advertisements, automatically subscribing the user to paid services, and participating in DDoS attacks, among other functions. The cryptocurrency mining module maintains a load sufficiently high enough to cause physical damage to a test device after two days—the above photo shows a device which overheated to the point the battery bulged.

Read More
2

[Deal Alert] Arlo Pro 2 discounts include $100 off four-cam kit ($700), $30 off two-cam kit ($450), and $20 off single cam ($200)

For anyone looking for extra peace of mind at home, you could do worse than install a home security camera system. It's not a cheap endeavor by any means, but if you can afford to do it, there are genuine benefits to be had. Netgear's range of Arlo Pro cameras are among the best in the business, and right now it's possible to pick up its second-generation hardware at a tidy price.

Read More
6

Non-essential app blocking for corporate-managed phones comes to G Suite

Corporate data security is paramount—particularly in industries with regulations like HIPAA which include steep fines for negligently handled personal data. Accordingly, allowing employees access to that data on mobile devices is not without its share of risks, as the potential of malware or lost/stolen devices may result in expropriated data. Google has introduced an extra step for IT managers to ensure that devices are compliant with corporate-defined security policy. Device Policy will now restrict apps determined to be nonessential (like Chrome or Gmail) from running until a device is returned to compliance.

Read More
61

'Janus' vulnerability allows attackers to modify APKs without changing signature, APKMirror already protected

Since the first release, Android has required developers to sign their applications. When you update an app, Android will compare the update's signature to the existing version. If they match, the app update will install. This way, developers don't have to worry about modified APKs causing problems, and users are kept secure.

Read More
71

Ai.type keyboard app developer accidentally leaks personal data of 31 million users

Another week, another potentially serious data breach. The emails, phone numbers, and locations of 31 million users of Android keyboard app Ai.type have been compromised after the developer failed to secure the server on which the information was stored. Some 577 gigabytes of data is said to have been exposed, representing more than three quarters of the app's total userbase.

Read More
16

Google Safe Browsing will soon require apps with personal user or device data to provide a privacy policy, trigger warnings if they don't

Security is a big deal these days. Google understands this, which is why its Safe Browsing team is implementing even more mandates for applications. Apps that handle user or device data will soon have to provide their own privacy policies. If this requirement isn't met, warnings may be shown on users' devices.

Read More
27

Google research project uses AI to detect someone spying on your messages

Google is constantly working on projects with interesting potential, but we rarely get to hear about them at such an early stage in development as this latest one. Google researchers Hee Jung Ryu and Florian Schroff have been developing software on a Pixel phone that uses the front-facing camera to spot someone looking over your shoulder at the screen.

Read More
8

BlueBorne vulnerability affected Google Home and Amazon Echos, but both have been patched

Vulnerabilities. There's a new flavor of the week every few days and in this highly connected world, it's tough to keep up, whether it's for users who don't know which of their devices are vulnerable and have/haven't been patched or for companies who are scrambling to fix one bug only to see the next one around the corner.

The BlueBorne vulnerability affected Bluetooth devices and could be exploited by hackers to completely take over a device with Bluetooth just turned on, without pairing with it first. Android patched it in September, but it appears that Amazon Echo and Google Home devices were left vulnerable for a while.

Read More
21

Toast overlay being used by malicious Android apps to install additional malware

Recently, Google has notified developers of apps that use Accessibility features for purposes other than helping users with disabilities to cease using those APIs or otherwise unpublish their app. The impetus for this move appears to be existence of (now removed) apps in the Play Store which use Accessibility features in conjunction with a vulnerability patched as part of the September security update to install malware.

Read More