Android Police

Articles Tagged:

scam

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[Update: Google responds] Google Maps being used for rampant booze-delivery scam in India, severe lack of moderation to blame

IRS agents won't ask you to pay back taxes with iTunes gift cards, and unverified images on a Google Maps listing don't necessarily represent the business owner — what seems like common sense to you and I can end up causing a lot of pain and anguish to less discerning individuals. Twitter user @DrunkenPandaman stumbled upon one such instance today, where the Google Maps listings of liquor stores across India are being flooded with thousands of images having phone numbers on them, seemingly promising home delivery for an advance payment — an obvious scam, that seems to be working.

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Chrome will soon warn you if you visit a phishing site with a lookalike URL

Phishing attempts involve a lot of trickery. You think you got an email from your colleague at androidpolice.com when you really received it from someone at androidpollce.com. Or you mistype one letter in a URL and you're taken to a site that looks exactly the same, but isn't the one you wanted. One minute later you've entered your email, password, and maybe credit card on an unknown site and your details have been stolen for good. Even the best of us (and the most tech-savvy and aware) can miss a small letter change, so it only makes sense that there's a more automated and systematic check that could save us from these situations.

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Fake Fortnite APKs are out there, don't be tricked into downloading one

Given Fortnite's current hotness, we understand if you've been scouring the web for an APK to download onto your phone. After all, Epic Games said that Fortnite would be making its way to Android this summer, and it's basically summer at this point. But be forewarned: Fortnite is not out on Android yet, and anything you see claiming to be a Fortnite APK is a scam.

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[Sweet Revenge] IRS phone scammers get a taste of their own medicine after messing with a programmer

Phone scams are getting more frequent and elaborate with time. Nowadays, one of the schemes involves scammers pretending they're from the IRS and accusing you of fraud then requesting payments to clear up your name and account. You'd have to imagine that a lot of people wouldn't dare questioning the IRS or appearing the least bit resistant or uncooperative with its reps, so these scams are usually very successful.

What the scammers didn't count on in this case, though, is messing with a programmer. When the victim realizes he's being duped, he proceeds to write a script that calls the scammers' phone number 28 times a second and floods their lines completely, rendering their entire operation useless.

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Google bakes phishing protection into the Gmail for Android app

Perhaps due to today's outbreak of a widespread phishing scam, or simply by coincidence, Google is rolling out enhanced anti-phishing security checks in Gmail for Android. When users tap on a suspicious link, the above warning will now appear.

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Google releases official statement on widespread Google Docs phishing email

Phishing emails are annoying and potentially dangerous, but very rarely do we see one as nefarious as this. A specific email, shown above, has been making waves in the news and Google has released an official statement regarding it.

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Plastc joins the likes of Coin, declaring bankruptcy

Some of you might remember Plastc. They were a company that jumped on the re-programmable credit card train Coin and Google Wallet started in '13 and '12, respectively. They may have been a bit later to the game in 2014 after even Google had decided that it wasn't a good idea anymore, but they made the attempt. Later even the funding-successful Coin had to close shop due to delays, problems, and a general failure to properly keep up with the market. Unlike Coin, though, Plastc never managed to actually deliver on a product. And now just like its forebears, Plastc has decided it's time to die.

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Google Play Books Still Has An Alarming Number Of Scammy Book Listings

A couple of months ago, we published a story about the scam problem in Google Play Books, and we haven't been alone in criticism of the store's issues.

The gist is this: Google's Play Books store was plagued by scammy "guide" books that, for a few dollars, promised access to cracked APKs, but in reality provided nothing but scams and malware.

Two of the publishers we mentioned in the post - Monster Guides Editor Pro and leon Master - were removed from the Play Store, but plenty remain, still distributing links to pirated apps and malicious sites, or outright selling the work of legitimate authors.

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[It's Dangerous To Go Alone] Google Takes More Proactive Steps To Combat 'Unwanted Software' Spam

Google stands to make the most money if you're online using its search engine and viewing its ads, preferably in Chrome or on an Android device. But sometimes the internet can be a tricky place to navigate safely, and that's just not good for business. So the company is continuing its push to make the web a safer place to browse on PCs and mobile devices alike.

Before you visit a webpage that tries to trick you into downloading unwanted, potentially harmful software, Chrome will now stop you and dish out an intimidating, red warning.

The site ahead contains harmful programs. Attackers ... might attempt to trick you into installing programs that harm your browsing experience (for example, by changing your homepage or showing extra ads on sites you visit).

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The #1 New Paid App In The Play Store Costs $4, Has Over 10,000 Downloads, A 4.7-Star Rating... And It's A Total Scam [Updated]

Computer security is important, even if the computer in question fits in your hand. There should be no doubt about that fact. However, you should be just as wary of security software as any other app. Case in point: there's a slick new app in the Play Store called Virus Shield. It's got a cool look and it's easy to operate. Just press a single button and your virus shield is activated.

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For a new app, and especially one that costs $3.99, it's doing phenomenally well. Appbrain says it's been available for just over a week, and it's currently the #1 new paid app...

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