Android Police

Articles Tagged:

privacy

42

If you use Neighbors, your Ring camera footage and location can be easily found by anyone

Welcome to the great surveillance society: more people are installing Ring cameras as an affordable and easy way to improve the security of not just their household, but, through use of the associated Neighbors app which lets users share their footage with local police, their entire neighborhood. But while the consumer's benefits are seemingly clear, there may be hidden consequences as well: Gizmodo was able to acquire and uncover precise coordinate data from 65,800 Neighbors posts detailing where reporting households were located.

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7

Bulk delete is coming to Google Maps Timeline in January 2020

Human memory is a funny thing. You'll never be able to forget that time you embarrassed yourself in fifth grade, but you probably can't remember where you had lunch a few weeks ago. Google Maps can help with the latter. Your Maps Timeline remembers everywhere you go, but what if you want to remove some locations? That's about to get easier with bulk deletion support.

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6

The new Facebook Viewpoints app will pay you a pittance to take surveys

Facebook has a history of collecting mountains of user data and doing a pretty awful job of keeping it safe. If you, for some reason, are comfortable giving Facebook even more data, there's a new app to help you do it. Facebook Viewpoints is a survey app that awards point for participation. When you get enough points, Facebook will give you a whole five bucks.

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28

Leak exposes social profile info, phone numbers, and more for 1.2 billion people

In one of the biggest breaches in recent history, data from more than 1.2 billion individuals has been leaked online. It stems from a publicly available server which pulled its data from a pair of so-called data enrichment companies — People Data Labs and oxydata — that aggregate personal information on millions of individuals and sell it to customers. The firms in question can't explain how the data got there.

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15

(Update: Removed from Play Store) Shady app lets stalkers view private Instagram accounts in exchange for their own data

Facebook doesn't have the best reputation when it comes to minding its users' privacy, and Cambridge Analytica exploiting the social network's third-party APIs for unchecked data collection surely hasn't helped. Now, we've found another service called Ghosty that takes advantage of Instagram's API to create a stalker paradise. By crowdsourcing the data of all of its users' Instagram accounts, it lets anyone view many private profiles.

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26

(Update: Public release) Google Maps Incognito Mode sent to preview group for testing

It's been a long time coming — 4 months, actually, for those of you remembering back to Google I/O — but we're finally getting our first real look at Incognito Mode for Google Maps. Ironically, the pictures we have are courtesy of some members of the Google Maps Preview test group who wish to remain anonymous.

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30

[Update: Rolling out] WhatsApp won't throw you into unwanted group chats anymore

Consent. We've heard everyone talk a lot more about it these days, but it doesn't just apply to people, it should also be required in the tech world. Specifically, from our apps and the services we use. If I like a certain service but don't want to give it all the freedom to do everything it wants, I should be able to limit it. Take for example WhatsApp's groups. For years, anyone could add you to a group, without asking you or even knowing you, and WhatsApp let them do it. You just get a notification that you've been added to a group; you can leave it, sure, but you were already added.

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37

Google announces new privacy features and upgrades its password manager

With the increasing scrutiny around the privacy of users, Google has announced some new features to give us all some additional peace of mind. Updates to Maps, YouTube, and Assistant will make it easier to control how much of your data the company has access to, and Password Checkup will help you ensure everything stays secure.

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38

My Echo is the one that says 'Bad Motherfucker:' Samuel L. Jackson will be an Alexa voice

Amazon just reported that Alexa is now available on over 85,000 devices, a 41% spike from May, from 9,500 brands — up another 28.3% from four months ago. With those kinds of numbers, it is paramount that more thought be put into a user's sense of privacy and security when they own an Alexa product. Today, the company announced a number of improvements, features, and skills it has worked towards in the past year with some new features available from today — notably including the coming addition of Samuel L. Jackson as a voice for Alexa.

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45

Google Assistant improves privacy and adds sensitivity options for hotword detection

Google was heavily criticized when press uncovered it uses human contractors to transcribe some voice snippets from Assistant users around the world, though we could quickly discern this as scaremongering as only 0.2% of all recordings were affected, and, of course, any company wanting to improve voice recognition needs to use transcriptions to advance. Still, Google should have clearly disclosed that your conversations with Assistant aren't 100% private. After temporarily pausing the practice in the EU, the company today announced it's improving key aspects of Assistant aiming to inform users about privacy more clearly, along with sensitivity options for hotword detection.

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