Android Police

Articles Tagged:

privacy

15

Google kills service for carriers that mapped coverage and performance with anonymous user data

Back in April, Google silently shut down its "Mobile Network Insights" service, which provided carriers with data about network performance in different locations as provided by Android handsets. According to an exclusive report from Reuters, Google killed the service as a result of concerns regarding user data privacy, even though the information that was given to carriers was ostensibly stripped of identifying information.

Read More
18

Facebook failed to disclose human voice chat transcription program

Ever since the controversy arose surrounding Google training its voice recognition technology using human contractors, barely a week goes by without another company admitting to the same. While the practice doesn't come as a surprise to many familiar with the underlying technology, no company thought of clearly stating what they were doing, which is not a good idea considering rising privacy awareness among customers and regulators. Bloomberg found out that the same is true for Facebook Messenger, affecting users who turned on voice-to-text for audio messages.

Read More
39

Google halts Assistant recording transcription in the EU for at least three months

Just a few weeks ago, a Belgian news service claimed Google was eavesdropping on users by listening to their private conversations. The company uses human employees to transcribe Assistant voice recordings to help it better understand what they're saying, and it turned out that one of these contractors leaked the material to the press. The controversy has led the Hamburg Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information (HmbBfDI) to start a procedure prohibiting Google from continuing to manually audit these recordings.

Read More
4

Google sets new privacy standards for Chrome extensions, but will they be enforced?

Browser extensions have become a critical attack vector, especially since many of them require access to all sites. Some malicious extensions were able to read passwords as you type them in or mine cryptocurrency in the background before Google removed them. Google has implemented several new changes for extensions over the past few months, and new ones will come into effect this October.

Read More
24

Google will pay just $13 million to settle long-running Street View data collection lawsuit

Google has spent years cruising down roads to gather data for Street View, but it isn't just after photographic data. The Street View cars also collect information about local WiFi networks, and a 2010 lawsuit alleged Google grabbed too much data. After nearly a decade of legal wrangling, Google is putting this issue to rest by paying a mere $13 million. That's a pittance compared to the billions in damages many observers predicted years ago.

Read More
111

Claims Google is 'eavesdropping' on your Google Home are a lot less exciting than they sound

Smart speakers add a layer of convenience to a household, but have you ever thought of them as planting a mole into your own living room? Back in April, Amazon admitted its employees reviewed anonymized recordings in order to improve its speech recognition system. Now a fresh controversy has emerged around Google and its Assistant, where the company confirms doing the very same — but there's still no need to worry.

Read More
111

Apple sold out kids' privacy yesterday under the guise of 'screen time' apps

I am far from an Apple "hater" - I applaud a great many of the company's decisions around its products and the more fully-baked state in which it tends to execute them (except keyboards, apparently). But yesterday during the onslaught of WWDC announcements, Apple quietly put the lid back on a boiling pot of a controversy, and it has seriously soured the company's messaging for me on respecting privacy.

Last year, after Apple introduced built-in screen time parental controls into iOS, it began to slowly cull similar - but not functionally the same - apps from the App Store. It did so under what, to me, is a perfectly fair piece of reasoning: these apps were all using VPNs or iOS's MDM (an enterprise device management system) explicitly for the purpose of monitoring a person's activity on their iOS device.

Read More
16

Telegram 5.7 further enhances privacy, improves group and channel features, and more

To get June started off right, Telegram just released v5.7 for Android. The main focus continues to be on privacy and improving those elements, but there's more, too. This update also comes with probably my favorite cartoon yet.

Read More
29

Google will crack down on app access to Drive files in the name of user privacy

Last year, Google began cracking down on third-party applications and services that could access Gmail. New restrictions were put in place to prevent unwanted behavior, and some applications were required to undergo security assessments. The response from most people has been largely positive, though there have been a few app casualties. As announced in a blog post, Google's next target for cracking down on bad third-party behavior appears to be Drive.

Read More
29

You can now ask Alexa to delete all your voice recordings from the day

The world is slowly waking up from a full trust in digital companies deep somber and realizing that privacy and security do matter a lot. Google, Amazon, Facebook, and other behemoths have started changing the way they do things, putting more control in the hands of users, especially when it comes to which of their data is stored and where it's used. Amazon is following along that path today by introducing a way for you to quickly delete all your Alexa voice recordings from the day.

Read More