Android Police

Articles Tagged:

play store policies

55

Slide for Reddit returns to Play Store, single word in app listing's screenshot blamed for removal (Updated)

Slide for Reddit is a reasonably popular third-party, cross-platform, open-source Reddit client. In my humble opinion, it's the best one out there (don't @ me), but fans of the app may have noticed that it disappeared from the Play Store in the last couple of days. It turns out, the developer ran into a small problem with the app's rating, which, thanks to Google's stereotypically terrible developer support, quickly exploded into a full-blown suspension of the developer's account. (Update: And now it's back on the Play Store.)

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FX File Explorer is back on the Play Store after being wrongfully accused of displaying deceptive ads (Updated)

Google has a serious problem with draconian, overreaching app removal policies in the Play Store. Instead of taking the time to discuss minor issues with developers, the company loves to use a sledgehammer to crack the nuts. The latest app to take the hit is FX File Explorer, a popular file manager with more than 5 million downloads and a 4+ rating. It has been removed without warning because it allegedly sports deceptive ads, which is not true as far as we can tell.

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53

[Update: Delays may exceed 7 days] Google Play Store silently extends app review to all submissions, fails to inform developers

The Play Store has often been compared to the wild west; which may be good or bad, depending on your perspective. Unlike Apple's App Store and the Amazon AppStore, developers have long been free to publish their apps without going through a lengthy curation stage, and only those that contained malware or used restricted APIs were blocked. However, it appears Google may have quietly instigated a more involved review process that impacts every app and update.

Back in April, an Android Developers blog post mentioned that Google would be taking more time to examine apps from devs that hadn't established a track record with the Play Store.

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5

Google won’t suspend developers who fail to maintain unpublished apps, as previously feared

Play Store rules and policies have always been fluid and quick to change. Lately, Google has emphasized user security over usability. One instance is the crackdown on purported misuse of SMS and call permissions, making some developers rethink or remove basic functionality in their apps. A Reddit thread surfaced that suggested old, unpublished applications would also need to be updated, with emails and help documents seemingly implying that not addressing the issue could result in the suspension of developers' accounts. Thankfully this isn't the case, according to an Android Developer Relations spokesperson who joined the conversation.

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63

Google Releases Free Developer-Oriented Guidebook "The Secrets To App Success On Google Play"

Have you felt the draw to get into app development, but didn't really know how to get started? Google wants to make things a little easier with a brand new guidebook that's meant to get developers on the right path. The Secrets to App Success on Google Play is an 81-page eBook that outlines the process and best practices for developing and submitting your software to the Play Store, and hopefully make some money on it. You won't get anything in-depth about writing code or managing a software business, but there are some good tips and tricks.

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The book covers a range of topics across these three common themes: getting set up on Google Play, developing a high quality and engaging app, and making money on it.

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