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Articles Tagged:

patent lawsuit

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Qualcomm and Meizu settle patent dispute amicably, no hard feelings

After months of fighting and court battles, including filings in China and multiple other countries, it seems that Qualcomm and Meizu, the Chinese phone manufacturer, have settled their dispute over patents. According to a press release from Qualcomm, the two have come to an agreement regarding Meizu's use of technology that Qualcomm said violated its patents.

Specifically, Qualcomm has granted Meizu a royalty-bearing license to develop, manufacture and sell devices that Qualcomm has patents on: CDMA2000, WCDMA, and 4G LTE mobile modems. This agreement resolves all patent disputes between Qualcomm and Meizu, in all countries litigation was ongoing; the United States, China, Germany, and France.

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US Supreme Court sides against Apple in the latest iPhone patent appeal, potentially saving Samsung $399 million

It's been a rough year for Samsung, but the Supreme Court just gave the company a big early Christmas present... or at the very least, they denied one to Apple. Reuters reports that the highest court decided unanimously (8-0) that the $399 million in damages sought by Apple in the years-old iPhone design patent case was too much, siding with Samsung's appeal which said that copying only certain elements of the iPhone design patent didn't entitle Apple to all profits made from an infringing phone.

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Qualcomm files a patent complaint against Meizu in Chinese court

Meizu is using technology that violates Qualcomm's patents without the usual licensing rigmarole, and Qualcomm isn't gonna take it anymore. So it is alleged in Qualcomm's press release, announcing a complaint against the up-and-coming Chinese manufacturer in the Beijing Intellectual Property Court. Qualcomm says that Meizu has refused to negotiate "in good faith" to license particular patents, especially those related to 3G and LTE radio standards, though the precise patents in question aren't delineated.

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Motorola Ordered To Pay Fujifilm $10 Million For Camera Patent Infringement

If corporate patent litigation was a soap opera, it would be at once the most interesting and most snooze-inducing show on television. The latest twist comes from a three-year-old suit by Fujifilm against Motorola Mobility, which was still a Google company instead of a Lenovo one when the suit first started. Fuji alleged that Moto violated three camera patents and one wireless patent in its phones without licensing. A San Francisco court invalidated Fuji's claims on all but one of them, so Moto will have to pay for the privilege of one camera patent.

That corporate faux pas will cost Motorola (and by extension, Lenovo) $10.2 million USD, according to a report by Reuters.

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Google Wants To Buy Your Patents To Keep Them Away From Patent Trolls

The world of technology patents is in bad shape. When John Oliver decides that he needs to spend 15 minutes explaining exactly how bad patent trolling has become, you know something rots in the USPTO. Google is trying to stem the tide of patent trolling and litigation via the simple expedient of throwing a ton of cash at the problem. They want to buy your patents.

Well, maybe not your patent in particular - odds are pretty good that they're only interested in technology and software patents, and even then, only so that some fly-by-night LLC with a dozen lawyers and no physical address won't sue them in the future.

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Apple Sues Ericsson Over 'Non-Essential' Wireless Patents, Ericsson Sues Apple Right Back

This story is about American hardware and software company Apple and Swedish telecom infrastructure company Ericsson. Neither of these companies makes Android hardware (though Ericsson dabbled in it with its ex-partner Sony), but the outcome might affect all manufacturers that release phones in the United States. That said, it's about patents and lawsuits, so get ready for a snore-fest over the next few paragraphs. Don't say we didn't warn you.

Still with us? Alright. Ericsson is the largest manufacturer of telecommunications equipment in the world, though their sales are mostly business-to-business, so most consumers don't see a lot of their wares.

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Samsung Counter-Sues NVIDIA, NVIDIA Says 'Nuh-Uh,' Both Companies Refuse To Go To Time Out

Can't two grown international mega-corporations just get along? Apparently not. Two months after NVIDIA filed suit against Samsung in Delaware, Samsung is suing NVIDIA right back. The South Korean manufacturer alleges that NVIDIA violated some of its technical patents, including data use and semiconductor buffering. Samsung then upped the ante by accusing NVIDIA of false advertising, saying that NVIDIA's claims that the SHIELD Tablet has the world's fastest mobile processor are demonstrably false.

Samsung named Velocity Micro, a boutique PC manufacturer based in Virginia, in the same patent suit. Velocity Micro is actually accused of violating eight Samsung patents to NVIDIA's six.

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NVIDIA Sues Samsung And Qualcomm For Violation Of Seven GPU Patents, Seeks To Block Hardware Shipments

If you were hoping that the litigious nature of the consumer electronics industry would fade out any time soon, well, keep on hoping. Today NVIDIA announced that it has initiated a suit against phone and tablet manufacturer Samsung and mobile chip supplier Qualcomm in the US District Court of Delaware for violating seven of its patents. The company is also petitioning the International Trade Commission to block shipments of Samsung devices using Adreno, Mali, or PowerVR graphical processing units.

According to a blog post on NVIDIA's website, representatives approached Samsung to try and secure a patent licensing deal for the use of these seven patents.

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Jury Finds Samsung Guilty Of Patent Infringement And Awards Apple Almost $120 Million In Damages

The latest round of back-and-forth in the endless IP battle between Apple and Samsung is over, and the former has come out on top. According to an 8-person jury in the federal court, various Samsung phones and tablets, including the Galaxy S II and III, Galaxy Note, and Galaxy Nexus, infringed on three Apple patents. The jury awarded Apple $119.6 million USD in damages. 

Apple didn't have it all its own way: the jury also found that none of the Samsung phones presented violated two other Apple patents, and they awarded Samsung $158,400 after finding Apple guilty of unintentionally violating one of the Korean company's patents presented in a counter-suit.

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