Android Police

Articles Tagged:

mesh

16

Grab a refurb Orbi RBK50, Netgear's excellent Mesh system, for only $180 on Woot ($120 off)

If you've been looking for a whole home Mesh Wi-Fi router, drop everything you're doing and listen to me. I'll tell you about a discount on the Netgear Orbi RBK50 on Woot, and I wouldn't be this excited if I hadn't recently purchased the same system and wasn't utterly happy about my decision. Do we have an, erm, deal?

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10

Linksys Velop 2-pack mesh Wi-Fi is $100 (50% off) on B&H

Making sure that your entire house is blanketed in the ever-so-important waves of Wi-Fi is a huge pain sometimes. Though routers nowadays are much, much better than ever before, their range of coverage is not always sufficient. That's why mesh networks have risen in popularity. And B&H has a deal for you to get started on keeping everyone and everything in your home connected — right now, you can pick up a two-pack of Linksys's Velop AC2600 mesh routers in white for just $99.99, half off the $199.99 asking price.

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16

Huawei hops on the mesh network bandwagon with the WiFi Q2

At CES 2018, Huawei announced its new home network/router solution, the WiFi Q2. Although similar to other products on the market, like Google's or Netgear's offerings, the WiFi Q2 differs slightly in that it's "the world's first" hybrid system for blanketing your home in wireless signal.

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99

Android 8 Oreo may be causing Wi-Fi connection problems for some with mesh routers like Netgear's Orbi

If you've been having trouble with your Netgear Orbi mesh network, and you have a Pixel or Pixel 2, then your phone might be to blame. Or, at least, the software on it. There are many reports of spontaneous access point reboots, crashes, and intermittent connection issues for those using mesh network access points with devices running Android Oreo. 

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13

[Update: Now $238] Deal alert: NETGEAR Orbi AC3000 (RBK50) mesh Wi-Fi router is $279.99 ($120 off)

Mesh Wi-Fi networks are pretty great. You don't have to worry about where your primary router is placed, and you don't have to create two (or more) Wi-Fi networks to cover your home. Google Wi-Fi and Ubiquiti are probably the best-known in this field, but Netgear's Orbi is fairly popular as well. Now you can get the AC3000 mesh router with one 'satellite' station (RBK50) for $279.99 - a $120 saving over the MSRP.

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9

Open Garden 2.0 Comes With Channel Bonding, Enhanced Reliability, Same User-Friendly Mesh Networking

Everyone's favorite mesh networking startup Open Garden today announced its 2.0 refresh at LAUNCH festival, having allegedly already served 2.1 million installs since version 1.

Readers would be forgiven for not remembering exactly what Open Garden is, or why it's interesting – we last covered the app in its beta stage.

Basically, the idea behind Open Garden is to create ubiquitous internet access by linking various smart devices together and sharing a common internet connection in a mesh network. For example, if your smartphone is connected to the internet, Open Garden would allow you to create a mesh network to which your tablet, another phone, a PC, or all of the above could connect.

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20

Open Garden Beta Comes To The Play Store – Create Mesh Networks, Share Internet Connectivity On The Fly

Open Garden is hands down one of the most impressive apps I've seen this year. The app, first introduced at TechCrunch Disrupt NYC 2012 as the startup that would go on to win the conference title of Most Innovative Startup, allows users to create an "open garden" of internet connectivity for multiple devices to share. The startup's official website explains it this way:

The operators sell us fancy handsets, but behave as if broken networks are a fact of life. … Imagine, instead, if all of the smartphones in any location could use their formidable processing power to share access to the Internet.

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5

Serval Project: Network-Free Communication, Or A Temporary Self-Organizing Self-Powered Network, For Android

Ah, the power of open. A team of people (mainly developers) has come together to develop a new communication method for times when existing infrastructure just doesn't work. They've  come up with two systems:

The Serval Project consists of two systems.

The first is a temporary, self-organising, self-powered mobile network for disaster areas, formed with small phone towers dropped in by air.

The second is a permanent system for remote areas that requires no infrastructure and creates a mesh-based phone network between Wi-Fi enabled mobile phones, and eventually specially designed mobile phones that can operate on other unlicensed frequencies, called Batphone.

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