Android Police

Articles Tagged:

machine learning

52

Google Photos shiny new ML-powered editor is now rolling out widely

Google Photos shiny new ML-powered editor is now rolling out widely

Back at its Launch Night In event, Google announced a redesigned Google Photos editor that makes machine-learning editing options more prominent. It was initially uncovered in a leak back in August, courtesy of app sleuth Jane Manchun Wong. The company promised that the revamp would roll out to Photos users gradually, and it appears that a lot of people have already received the server-side update by now. Check your Photos app to see if you also got in.

Read More
4

Microsoft's Trove marketplace lets you sell your photos for money and science

Microsoft's Trove marketplace lets you sell your photos for money and science

There are various photographer marketplaces on the web, which help professionals find interesting gigs that match their skills. These can be photoshoots for a new restaurant's dishes, a wedding, or even a new phone that's coming out. In most of these cases, the pictures are meant for private or commercial use, but I had never heard of images being captured explicitly for a machine's enjoyment, until now. Microsoft’s Trove project helps connect developers with people, who could supply photos to train machine learning models.

Read More
9

Chrome OS 85 significantly improves the handwriting keyboard for some Chromebooks

Chrome OS 85 significantly improves the handwriting keyboard for some Chromebooks

It's no secret that Google loves to add powerful AI into its software whenever it can. The next generation Google Assistant demoed at Google I/O in 2019 is an excellent example of how capable Google's AI can be, and it continuously blows my mind how quick and snappy voice processing is as a result. Google is now using its powerful AI to improve the handwriting experience on Chrome OS.

Read More
5

Gmail got slightly better at blocking malicious Office documents

Gmail got slightly better at blocking malicious Office documents

Gmail's spam and malware filters are among the best in the industry and block 99.9% of threats from reaching inboxes, according to Google. That doesn't mean there isn't room for improvement, as 0.1% can scale up to quite a substantial absolute number considering Gmail's big user base. Google has identified that malware in attachments (Office documents, in particular) tends to be dangerous due to its ever-changing nature, so it has developed an improved malware scanner that utilizes machine learning to stay ahead of the curve.

Read More
8

Google's AutoFlip algorithm will automatically crop your videos for different aspect ratios

Google's AutoFlip algorithm will automatically crop your videos for different aspect ratios

While you can use smartphones in horizontal orientations, apps like Instagram, TikTok, Snapchat, and others highly encourage vertical video formats. As such, content creators and regular folks shooting horizontally have to crop their clips to fit these social media platforms — a tedious process. Adobe and other companies have been working on automating this process for years, but now Google is also entering the intelligent auto-cropping game with its open-source AutoFlip framework.

Read More
10

Wyze Cam will temporarily lose person detection after AI provider cancels contract

Wyze Cam will temporarily lose person detection after AI provider cancels contract

Back in July, Wyze announced person detection on its security cameras which it implemented with the help of third-party service provider Xnor.ai. It seems like the contract between the companies lets the AI firm terminate the lease at any moment without reason, which is exactly what has happened, as Wyze announced in a blog post yesterday. Luckily, the camera manufacturer can continue using Xnor.ai's technology until mid-January 2020 and is already looking into rolling out its own in-house solution later next year.

Read More
13

Google's latest AI experiment FreddieMeter lets you know you'll never sing like Mr. Fahrenheit himself

Google's latest AI experiment FreddieMeter lets you know you'll never sing like Mr. Fahrenheit himself

Freddie Mercury may no longer be with us, but his legacy continues to live on in his music, in movies, and now in a web app that judges your singing talents. FreddieMeter analyzes vocal patterns to determine how closely you can recreate the unique voice of Freddie Mercury. It then gives you a score based on your accuracy in general pitch and melody, as well as how closely your timbre matches that of Freddie Mercury's.

Read More
158

(Update: Fixed) The Pixel 4's camera has serious white balance problems (gallery)

(Update: Fixed) The Pixel 4's camera has serious white balance problems (gallery)

Google has been pouring a lot of effort into nailing down photo processing on its flagships since it started building its own phones. In the Pixel 4 and 4 XL, the company may have added too many intelligent camera features for their own good. It introduced a new machine-learning-based white balance algorithm that is supposed to produce more natural-looking images under harsh lighting conditions, but as it turns out, some edge cases can end up looking worse instead.

Read More
32

Pixel 4’s Neural Core enables secure face unlock, on-device machine learning, and more

Pixel 4’s Neural Core enables secure face unlock, on-device machine learning, and more

We know that Google likes to add auxiliary processors to its devices, like an extra image processor called Visual Core starting with the Pixel 2 and 2 XL. It's no different for the Pixel 4 and 4 XL which have received an additional Neural Core. Google says that they're using it to power the phones' face unlock and to speed up on-device processing, always-on listening, and machine learning.

Read More
5

Chrome is about to make the web much better for blind people

Chrome is about to make the web much better for blind people

Google's machine learning wizardry is capable of more than just AR emoji. As proven by features like Live Relay, computational recognition of sound and images can lead to incredible quality-of-life improvements for people hard of hearing or sight. Google's newest trick? Chrome will soon add captions to every image on the web.

Read More
Mastodon