Android Police

Articles Tagged:

logcat

9

Tasker beta can react to Logcat entries, opening up a whole new set of actions

Tasker has always been an incredibly versatile and useful tool letting you automate your phone and even your smart home. The latest beta, 5.9.beta.8, makes the app even more powerful: It has gained the ability to react to Logcat events on your device, so it can now be triggered by snoozing an alarm or holding the back button. It can also discern which finger you're using to unlock your phone and start an action accordingly.

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20

Chainfire's LiveBoot, Now On The Play Store, Lets Root Users Watch LogCat Output With A Custom Boot Animation

Remember the not-so-glory days of home computing, when each and every action taken before your operating system booted up was rendered on-screen in glorious greyscale text? Now you can re-live those days (or I dunno, just install a really useful pre-boot tool) with LiveBoot. This customized boot animation with its own configuration tool comes from prolific developer Chainfire, who released a free version with a Pro upgrade into the Play Store.

LiveBoot does nothing more or less than replace your stock boot animation (the thing that loops between the manufacturer logo and Android actually starting up) with a more useful alternative that prints out the logcat and dmesg on the screen.

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42

Top Android Apps Every Rooted User Should Know About, Part 6: Apps 42-49

It's been quite a while since we've delved into the realm of root apps on Android, so let's get to it. If you're rooted and not taking advantage of it, why even bother? The Android development community is ready and waiting to help you master your device.

The apps on this list have been carefully selected as "must-have" apps for root users. Well, what are you waiting for? Read on for eight more great root apps.

46

Carrier IQ Explains How Its Software Works, Implicitly Blames HTC For Insecure Log Files, Data Leak Exposed By Trevor Eckhart

Amid the turmoil surrounding Carrier IQ, the company's VP of Marketing, Andrew Coward, has come forward in a series of interviews with a few clarifications.

For those not in the loop, the controversy around Carrier IQ is based on developer Trevor Eckhart's findings which indicated that Carrier IQ's software was indeed collecting a vast array of information, and his demonstration showing that said data could be read using a simple command – one that could be executed by any malicious app with access to logcat. This data includes location information, SMS messages, and key taps.

Before we dive into Coward's remarks on the issue of security (and why he says CIQ is not to be blamed for insecure logs), it's important to look at how CIQ actually functions on a device.

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15

For Developers: Android SDK Tools r15 And ADT 15 Bug Fixers Now Available

The Android 4.0 API that was released together with the unveiling of the Galaxy Nexus also brought us, developers, ADT 14 and SDK Tools r14, which quite a few people started having problems with almost immediately. The tools were released in an incomplete state based on my experience with ADT 14-preview, as some serious and known bugs weren't fixed when 14-final came out. I have a feeling the ICS event kind forced the corresponding ADT/tools 14 release and prompted Google to roll it out in what I consider a broken state (many reported crashes, broken Logcat, etc).

Thankfully, the tools team (hi, Tor and Xav!) persistently worked on the issues and just released ADT 15 and SDK Tools 15, brining much relief to those of us experiencing said problems (the un-pausable scrolling Logcat was killing me in the last few weeks).

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4

PSA: XFINITY App Exposes Your Comcast Username & Password In System Log

Before you panic, you should know that this isn't a huge deal, and Comcast is aware of the situation and has promised a fix "within a week or two." There, feel better? Good, because if you use the XFINITY app, any other app that has permission to read logs can read your Comcast username and password (aLogCat, for example).

The details, courtesy of aBSuRDiST, who discovered the issue:

My system log shows <userName>[email protected]</userName> and <password>MYPASSWORD</password> on a line that starts with "D/HTTPManager". I read the log using aLogcat (app available in the market). Open aLogcat, press menu and filter for "password".

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