Android Police

Articles Tagged:

Linux

11

Your Chromebook will be getting a massive gaming performance boost soon

Your Chromebook will be getting a massive gaming performance boost soon

Linux for Chromebooks has come a long way since Google introduced it in Chrome OS 69 a couple of years ago. On supported devices, it opened the door to an extensive library of desktop apps for users, like video editing tools and IDEs. GPU acceleration was an important milestone that made graphic intensive Linux app usable on Chrome OS. This is thanks to Virgil 3D, a component that allows the Linux container to tap into the hardware's GPU. In exciting news shared by Luke Short from VMware, Google is working on adding Vulkan passthrough into Virgil to improve app performance.

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20

Flutter 2 is coming with support for Windows and macOS, foldables, and a ton more

Flutter 2 is coming with support for Windows and macOS, foldables, and a ton more

The great unicorn of software development is to have one language and framework that enables devs to code an app once and run it on any operating system and any type of device. Flutter has been aiming to do this since its inception, and today it gets quite a bit closer to that goal with the announcement of Flutter 2. The latest major update brings major enhancements for mobile platforms, adds support to desktop, and massively extends its capabilities on the web — among other things.

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7

ADB: How to use it on Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, or even in a browser

ADB: How to use it on Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, or even in a browser

If you want to do any number of things that require access to Google's Android Debug Bridge (ADB) or fastboot tools for Android — sideload apps, install custom ROMs, take screenshots on certain Android platform versions, or access certain hidden features — you'll need to get it up and running on your platform of choice first. Fortunately, doing so virtually anywhere is possible at this point — even from another Android phone, or a web browser. We'll help you get set up no matter what platform you're on in this guide.

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1

Our 10 favorite Chrome and Chrome OS features from 2020

Our 10 favorite Chrome and Chrome OS features from 2020

2020 was (well, as of writing, still is) quite a crazy year, and that craziness also had a huge impact on the tech industry. The internet is gradually becoming more divided across countries, the trade war that completely changed Huawei's phone business is raging on, and the global pandemic affected both hardware and software release cycles — you might remember that Chrome and Chrome OS updates were temporarily paused when everyone started working from home.

Despite all that, there were also a lot of good things happening in tech: Foldables have matured and are headed for mainstream, budget phones don't suck anymore, Android has received tons of helpful features, and Chrome and Chrome OS have also benefitted from a lot of great developments.

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25

Pine64 partners with KDE for new Community Edition PinePhone

Pine64 partners with KDE for new Community Edition PinePhone

The first production-ready PinePhones became available earlier this year, giving Linux enthusiasts another option for a phone powered by open-source software. Pine64 has released a few different production runs of the PinePhone, each partnered with a different OS vendor, and a new model running KDE Plasma Mobile will be available next month.

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28

This phone doesn't run Android, but now it can run Android apps

This phone doesn't run Android, but now it can run Android apps

Android and iOS aren't the only mobile operating systems viable today. Last month, Corbin wrote about the PinePhone, a phone that runs Linux and has physical kill switches for privacy-minded people. The PinePhone isn't alone in its use of Linux; Purism's Librem 5 phone runs PureOS, a free, open-source operating system that's not based on Android. But just because phones like the Librem 5 don't run Android natively doesn't mean users have to miss out on the benefits of the Android ecosystem.

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29

How to play GeForce Now in your Chrome browser without installing anything on your PC or Linux machine

How to play GeForce Now in your Chrome browser without installing anything on your PC or Linux machine

While Google Stadia needs nothing but your browser to work, the story is different for GeForce Now. Nvidia would like you to install its dedicated application for its game streaming service on Windows and Mac. But ever since GeForce Now is available on Chromebooks, we know that it's capable of running inside Chrome, and where there's a will, there's a way. By spoofing your browser user agent with an official Google tool, you can use GeForce Now right in Chrome on your PC, Mac, or Linux machine — nothing but an extension required.

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71

The Linux-based PinePhone is the most interesting smartphone I've tried in years

The Linux-based PinePhone is the most interesting smartphone I've tried in years

Android's potential for customization was seemingly endless when it was first introduced, thanks to its Linux kernel and open-source nature. However, Google has introduced more restrictions over the past few years in the name of privacy and security, making root and other deep modifications difficult or impossible. While I agree that most of the security changes in Android are needed (I really don't need the Facebook app digging through my local files), they do mean you are not in full control of your own device.

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23

Hack the planet in style with the new Linux Terminal in Chrome OS 84

Hack the planet in style with the new Linux Terminal in Chrome OS 84

Google has been ramping up the Linux environment on Chrome OS lately, with features like microphone support and USB connections. For those of you who spend a lot of time in the command-line Terminal, Chrome OS 84 has updated the app with new themes and customization options.

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2

Chrome OS 84 tweaks Linux setup to include username and container sizing options

Chrome OS 84 tweaks Linux setup to include username and container sizing options

When Google introduced Chrome OS back in 2011, it was mostly just a window to the web. The operating system eventually expanded to include Android integration, and last year Google announced that every new Chromebook would be launching with Linux support. However, the implementation of Linux on Chrome OS had been a little limited out of the gate. Now with the launch of Chrome OS 84, Google is adding the ability to set a username and configure the Linux disk size during initial setup.

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