Android Police

Articles Tagged:

legal

7

Judge lets Lyft and Uber operate in California as fate of drivers left in the hands of voters

Californians are still able to order rides from Lyft and Uber this morning after an eleventh-hour decision by a state appellate court judge allowed the TNCs to continue operating with their drivers as contractors instead of employees. The two companies had announced they would suspend services as of 12:00 a.m. PDT as a result of Assembly Bill No. 5, which has implemented new tests as to how workers are classified.

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35

Android developer class action suit targets Play Store and its 30% transaction fee

Epic Games is waging legal war against Apple and Google for what it calls the exorbitant 30% revenue share those companies make on every app and in-app purchase. Indeed, every developer finds themselves paying the piper for the privilege of using what may arguably be the only practical commerce platforms of Android and iOS, but they don't usually have the means to file a suit. Now, though, one law firm is attempting to round up the aggrieved with proposed class-action litigation against Google.

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16

Google's antitrust woes intensify as California opens new investigation

Google has been no stranger to antitrust cases in recent years with the European Commission going after it several times, but there's now mounting pressure in its own country, too. The United States Department of Justice could be about to open legal proceedings against Google, along with numerous state attorneys across the nation and the House Judiciary Committee. Google's home state of California had been reluctant to join but has reportedly opened its own investigation in recent days.

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54

Justice Department reportedly ready to sue Google for antitrust violations

Google has been a target for anti-competitive lawsuits across the world, due to its dominance over online advertising, web searches, web browsers, and other industries. The United States Department of Justice (along with various states) has been conducting a probe into Google's potential antitrust violations for around a year, and now it seems a lawsuit could be imminent.

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35

Google fires back at Sonos with its own patent infringement countersuit

Back in January, Sonos filed a lawsuit against Google, telling the story of a company that used its power to steal intellectual property and infringe on 100 separate patents. The claims even raise the topic of antitrust. The filing called for the courts to ban the sale of most Google-made products with any relationship to audio. Google is now firing back with its own countersuit aiming to shut down the initial attack.

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35

New $5 billion lawsuit accuses Google of tracking users in Incognito Mode

A new class-action has been filed against Google for continuing to track users of the Chrome browser even though they were in Incognito Mode. The complaint alleges that unauthorized data collection takes place, contradicting the supposed protections of private browsing.

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7

Facebook's iffy past practices with facial recognition just cost it $550 million

While governments worldwide are starting to add facial recognition software to public cameras, Facebook has settled its long-term legal dispute concerning its use of this technology to tag people in photos uploaded to its platform. The company has agreed to pay $550 million to a group of plaintiffs from Illinois who argued the network didn't seek their consent when it first started the practice in 2011.

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77

Federal court ruling ends random searches of phones (and other devices) at U.S. airports and borders

Random searches of phones, laptops, and other electronic devices at airports (and other ports of entry) in the United States have increased over the past few years. In fact, the practice is so commonplace that some people choose to wipe their phones before traveling. Thankfully, a district court has decided that random searches of devices at ports of entry is unconstitutional, making the searches illegal.

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48

Google is the target of a new antitrust investigation by 50 attorneys general [Update: Google statement]

Google is a massive company that touches the lives of almost everyone in the US, and that has led to increasing regulatory pressure. Amid rumors of a federal probe, 50 attorneys general have joined forces to launch an antitrust probe of the company. According to Texas AG Ken Paxton, the leader of the investigation, the inquiry will focus on Google's advertising business, but it could expand depending on what they find.

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56

Huawei forecasts catastrophic drop in phone sales and revenue

When the US added Huawei to the Entity List last month, it sparked a series of troubles for the Chinese manufacturer that are beginning to have significant consequences on its shipments and revenue. Indeed, the company has been banned from doing business with US organizations, which means it had to stop its working relationships with chip manufacturers and even Google.

Although Huawei tried to reassure markets with mitigation measures, including an in-house OS; these didn't seem to convince buyers its devices were a safe bet. Indeed, British carriers paused the introduction of the manufacturer's 5G products and its partner Foxconn was said to be halting some Huawei production lines earlier this month.

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