Android Police

Articles Tagged:

law

22

South Korea could be the first country to legislate open app store payments

South Korea could be the first country to legislate open app store payments

South Korea is set to regulate an end to exclusive payment terms on app stores, striking an economic blow against the integrated mobile systems of Google and Apple. A bill approved by the National Assembly this week would force both companies to allow app developers to accept payments from third-party systems, on the Play Store and App Store, respectively. This would threaten the lucrative cut (between 15% and 30%) they receive on each digital transaction.

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50

India is demanding WhatsApp build a way to trace user messages

India is demanding WhatsApp build a way to trace user messages

The Indian government has specified a proposal to Facebook-owned WhatsApp that would involve tying an alpha-numeric hash to every message sent on its platform without decrypting the message itself. The push for the app to follow new cyber crime rules comes as it struggles with a major hit to its reputation over a privacy policy change in the country.

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26

Google will pay some Australian publishers after threat to leave market boomerangs

Google will pay some Australian publishers after threat to leave market boomerangs

Google is starting to back down on its threat to leave the Australian market. In a blog post today, the company extended an olive branch, highlighting Australian publishers that would be joining the News Showcase program, which pays publishers as part of a licensing program to refer traffic to their stories.

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7

Google to pay $3.8 million in response to claims of bias against female and Asian employees

Google to pay $3.8 million in response to claims of bias against female and Asian employees

Google’s market domination has drawn the company a lot of attention — and even more lawsuits. It has come under the microscope of several government agencies for exploiting its monopolistic position on so many occasions that we’ve frankly lost count. In the latest turn of events, Google is paying up $3.8 million in response to accusations of hiring and pay bias against female and Asian employees.

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29

Bing to the rescue: Microsoft happy to step in if Google pulls out of Australia

Bing to the rescue: Microsoft happy to step in if Google pulls out of Australia

Google threatened to leave the Australian market if the local government pulls through with a law that would require search engines to pay publishers for linking to news articles. The threat hasn't gone down well, and in a turn of events that shouldn't surprise anyone, smaller competitors are ready to step in should Google pull through with its decision if the law is passed. Microsoft is ready to agree and work with the Australian government going forward, just like DuckDuckGo.

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2

Google will disable Search in Australia if government insists that it pays publishers

Google will disable Search in Australia if government insists that it pays publishers

With great power comes great responsibility, and also great scrutiny — just ask Google. The world's leading search engine may have to pay publishers in Australia if new legislation is passed by the government. In response, Google has threatened to disable Search in the country if the new code is passed, and the threat has understandably not gone down well down under.

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162

Google says Americans don’t want it broken up in reaction to proposed new anti-trust rules

Google says Americans don’t want it broken up in reaction to proposed new anti-trust rules

Google, Amazon, Facebook, and other tech giants are increasingly coming under antitrust scrutiny, with high-profile sentences in the EU, cries for alternative app distribution platforms in India, and today's Google vs. Oracle Supreme Court hearing in the U.S. In the latest turn of events, the House Judiciary Committee has released a report on its investigation of competition in digital markets. Following the public hearing in July, it concludes that big companies are using their dominance to stifle the competition and proposes changes to antitrust laws. Naturally, Google isn't happy about these ideas.

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54

Justice Department reportedly ready to sue Google for antitrust violations

Justice Department reportedly ready to sue Google for antitrust violations

Google has been a target for anti-competitive lawsuits across the world, due to its dominance over online advertising, web searches, web browsers, and other industries. The United States Department of Justice (along with various states) has been conducting a probe into Google's potential antitrust violations for around a year, and now it seems a lawsuit could be imminent.

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45

Google is the target of a new antitrust investigation by 50 attorneys general [Update: Google statement]

Google is the target of a new antitrust investigation by 50 attorneys general [Update: Google statement]

Google is a massive company that touches the lives of almost everyone in the US, and that has led to increasing regulatory pressure. Amid rumors of a federal probe, 50 attorneys general have joined forces to launch an antitrust probe of the company. According to Texas AG Ken Paxton, the leader of the investigation, the inquiry will focus on Google's advertising business, but it could expand depending on what they find.

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37

Court rules Qualcomm violated antitrust law to maintain its monopoly

Court rules Qualcomm violated antitrust law to maintain its monopoly

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) launched a legal case against Qualcomm in 2017, and US District Judge Lucy Koh has just issued a scathing ruling against the dominant chipmaker. Koh's 233-page ruling details how Qualcomm illegally used its leverage in the market to stifle competition and impose unfair fees. As a result, Qualcomm's stock price has taken a nosedive.

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