Android Police

Articles Tagged:

iphone

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Project Fi is now Google Fi and supports phones from Samsung, OnePlus, and even iPhones

 

Project Fi has made the leap that all fledgling Google projects aspire to - after around three-and-a-half years, it has dropped the "project" and evolved into "Google Fi," with a brand new logo to boot. Along with the name change, Google has announced that the wireless provider now supports "the majority of Android devices," including Samsung and OnePlus handsets, and iPhones (in beta).

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Mark Zuckerberg ordered Facebook's executives to use Android phones

According to a report out of the New York Times yesterday, Facebook founder and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg ordered the company's high-level managers to switch to Android phones earlier this year. It's not clear if the order was ever enforced, or to what degree, but it apparently came on the heels of an MSNBC interview in which Tim Cook openly criticized Facebook's data collection and privacy policies in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal and associated congressional hearings.

Cook's remarks apparently so upset Zuckerberg that he issued the Android phone directive - though, as The Verge points out, it seems unlikely that it worked (at least very well):

[W]e checked Twitter activity from several Facebook executives, including blockchain lead David Marcus and VP of AR and VR Andrew “Boz” Bosworth, all of whom are still shown to be using iPhones.

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OnePlus Switch adds support for iPhone data transfer [APK Download]

Changing to a new phone can be a hassle; it's especially annoying for those of us who have to do it often. Thankfully, many OEMs include a proprietary data transfer app to help you through the process. OnePlus has the Switch app, and it's just been updated with support for moving from an iPhone.

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Weekend poll: Are you getting one of the new iPhones?

I know, I know, we're the Android Police, so I'm sure the vast majority of our readers will answer "No" when it comes to buying one of Apple's new iPhones. Still, Android doesn't exactly exist in a vacuum, and a surprising number of our readers use iOS. We'll keep it our secret, this is just between you and me — and the rest of our readers, I suppose. At least the results are anonymous.

Are you thinking about picking up a new iPhone?

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Android Police talks Apple: The biometric gap, shifting affordability, and Watch envy

Last year, Apple's iPhone X literally changed how the company's customers used their phones, dropping such steadfast design choices as the home button and fingerprint sensor in pursuit of that all-screen dream. Yesterday's announcement wasn't as shocking, but it did democratize 2017's changes with the new, more affordable iPhone XR. In its own way, Apple is set yet again to change how its customers use its phones by delivering most of its flagship features at a new, more palatable price.

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Google Pay is rolling out on the web for desktop and iOS

The move from Android Pay, Google Wallet, and Pay with Google to Google Pay hasn't been completely smooth sailing, but the Mountain View giant is slowly getting its footing and transitioning everything from the old brandings to the new one. The latest to make the switch are web payments done either on desktop or on iOS.

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The US smartphone market is devolving into a Samsung and Apple market - and that's bad for Android

If you live in the United States and walk into a Verizon store, you have essentially four options when it comes to choosing a premium smartphone brand: Apple, Samsung, LG, and Google. Yesterday, we learned that continuing to expect LG will be one of these options probably isn't the best bet.

While there may yet be a premium LG phone that launches on Verizon, the Korean conglomerate looks poised to join Motorola as one of Verizon's when-it's-convenient handset partners, and is quite possibly on its way to the Verizon graveyard with the likes of HTC, Sony, and BlackBerry.

The same can generally be said of AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint.

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Switching to the iPhone, part three: Everything I hate about the iPhone X

I look at my phone. It vibrates. It asks for my password.

This is the single most annoying experience I have on a regular basis with the iPhone X. Face ID is at once pretty good and absolutely infuriating. The iPhone X is, as a result, the most frustrating smartphone I have used in recent memory. The iPhone X is also pretty great, but when it rubs me the wrong way, it really rubs me the wrong way.

Switching to the iPhone hasn't been without annoyances and sacrifices. In fact, it's come with quite a few, if I'm going to be honest with you about it.

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Android to iPhone, part two: What I've liked about switching to the iPhone X

I can already tell I’ll have a hard time going back to Android’s software navigation keys.

One of the most pleasantly surprising features of the iPhone X - and something that’s going to read like it’s straight out of Phil Schiller’s marketing playbook - comes in the form of what Apple removed from the phone: the home button. By forcing the issue of gesture navigation instead of going half-in with soft keys, Apple’s made a convert of me. I like gesture nav.

It’s also kind of broken. There’s no universal gesture to go back (some apps let you swipe from the left - sometimes), and the quick switcher button at the top left of the phone requires some serious thumb acrobatics to reach.

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I’ve never used an iPhone, part one: Switching to the iPhone X and first thoughts

On a fall day over eight years ago, I walked into an AT&T store in Davis, my college town, to see the iPhone 3GS. I held it, stared at it, looked at the price card, then back at the phone, and then down at the price card again. Reality began to set in.

I was locked into a contract with my Sony-Ericsson feature phone for another six months. I asked about early upgrade pricing - $200 on top of the $199 AT&T already charged for the phone - but I was a student, and my meager checking account balance could barely withstand the regular on-contract price and accompanying increase in the monthly service fee.

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