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Articles Tagged:

Intel

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Intel, Qualcomm, and other suppliers blacklist Huawei, putting businesses in imminent danger

Since the Department of Commerce added Chinese manufacturer Huawei to its 'Entity List,' thus limiting its ability to import U.S.-made products, we've seen some of the company's most important supplier relationships take a hit. Alphabet may have been the vendor with the highest profile as many of Huawei's Android products rely on software services from Google. But chip producers, including one in Germany, have also had to limit their ties to the telecommunications company.

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'ZombieLoad' CPU attack becomes public, most Google devices not affected

Yesterday, Intel disclosed a new attack on its processor dubbed "ZombieLoad," following in the footsteps of last year's "Spectre" and "Meltdown" security snafu. The CPU producer has informed other companies of the problems before the public, and thus many devices and OS manufacturers have already patched their software. Among the now-secured products is Google’s ChromeOS, but not Android running on Intel silicon.

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Intel gives up on 5G modems because Qualcomm ate its Apple pie

Apple and Qualcomm have settled their patent and royalty disputes, paving the way for the latter's 5G modems to be installed on the former's smartphones in the year 2020 and beyond. Intel, which staked its hopes on swooping up a meaty iPhone modem contract, has folded upon itself, announcing that it is ending development of its 5G modems for smartphones.

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USB4 will double the speed of USB 3.2 by basically becoming Thunderbolt 3

Yesterday, the USB Promoter Group revealed the next evolution of its ubiquitous peripheral spec: USB4. The new specification, which is still a draft in the final stages of review, is based on Intel's Thunderbolt 3 protocol, delivering up to 40Gbps throughput over existing, Thunderbolt spec-certified Type-C cables. That's twice as fast as current USB 3.2 maximums. It's also backward compatible with existing USB 3.2, 2.0, and Thunderbolt 3 specs and devices.

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Intel's 5G modem will land in the second half of 2019

We're on the cusp of the 5G revolution, as big players like Qualcomm and Huawei would like us to believe. Not to be left out in the cold, Intel has sped up the timeline for the release of its 5G modem, which it calls the XMM 8160. According to the company, partners can expect to get their hands on the 8160 in the second half of next year.

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Android Studio device emulator now works with AMD processors and Hyper-V

Android Studio's device emulator used to be incredibly slow, even on capable hardware. Google has drastically improved the performance over the past two years, but a few issues remain. The Windows version of the Android Emulator uses HAXM, which only works on Intel processors. That means AMD-powered computers can only use non-accelerated ARM images.

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Latest Spectre variant affects x86 and ARM CPUs

Spectre and Meltdown are still fresh in our mind, but already researchers from Microsoft and Google have found a new vulnerability, named Speculative Store Bypass (SSB), that could allow for malicious software to indirectly read from memory. Some Intel and AMD processors are vulnerable, but of greater Android-related concern is the susceptibility of 5 ARM reference designs going back to 2011's Cortex-A15 and including the latest A75.

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Intel won't make wearables anymore, but its mobile chips aren't going anywhere

Earlier this week, The Information reported that Intel will be shutting down its New Devices Group, the branch responsible for developing wearable consumer products such as the Vaunt smart glasses prototype. The news comes a few months after Intel announced it had also given up on developing its own smart watches and trackers.

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Possibly the last Intel x86-powered phone was displayed at MWC

Intel may have announced the end of its ultra-low-power Atoms almost two years ago, but the death of the platform wasn't instantaneous, it took some time. While it was sad to see another mobile SoC competitor drop out of the race, at the same time it seemed inevitable given Intel's x86-based approach.

However, Intel's mobile death-throes continue to be dragged out due to contractual obligations, and a couple new chipsets have been released based on the Intel's x86 designs. In fact, Senwa was showing off a pair of Intel-powered devices at MWC this year. Although we might have missed them when we were there, Anandtech didn't.

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Intel reportedly looking to buy Broadcom, which is trying to take over Qualcomm

Despite being de facto leader of processors for desktops and laptops, Intel never made a large impression in the smartphone SoC market. The company spent around $10 billion attempting to compete with Qualcomm and other companies, but ultimately gave up in 2016. According to The Wall Street Journal, Intel is reportedly looking into purchasing Broadcom, assuming Broadcom's hostile takeover of Qualcomm works out.

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