Android Police

Articles Tagged:

import ban

13

Huawei receives third 90-day reprieve from US trade ban (Update: Commerce Department issuing special licenses)

For the third time this year, the US Commerce Department has granted another 90-day reprieve to Huawei that lets American companies continue to do business with China's biggest telecom. The new rule takes effect on November 18th, and it follows the first extension granted in May and the second in August.

Read More
106

[Update: Mate X, too] Huawei Mate 30 may be forced to launch without Google apps and services

According to a report published today by Reuters, Huawei's upcoming Mate 30 series of phones may have to eschew Google's apps as a result of the trade ban imposed by the U.S. government. While the phone should still be able to run Android, given the free and open availability of the software, deeper integration with Google's apps and services like the Play Store and YouTube will be missing if an exemption can't be secured.

Read More
22

Huawei gets another 90-day reprieve from the U.S. trade ban

Huawei is being given another 90-day reprieve by the U.S. government, following the Temporary General License (TGL) issued back in May. That provides the company with three more months to continue purchasing goods from U.S. companies. While this extension might sound like a step towards dropping the Entity List import/export ban for good, the government is clear that the extra few months are merely meant to "afford consumers across America the necessary time to transition away from Huawei equipment."

Read More
190

[Update: Potential extension] Huawei granted temporary reprieve from US import ban, suppliers and clients relieved of havoc for now

The Department of Commerce has announced a 90-day reprieve to an import ban against Chinese manufacturer Huawei. The company now has a Temporary General License to engage with U.S. vendors on a limited basis — in this case, Google will be allowed to provide software updates to Huawei for its Android phones while Huawei's component suppliers will be able to finish deliveries for previously-made orders. It will also give telcos dependent on Huawei products time to potentially find alternative solutions.

Read More
42

US reportedly stalls on giving Huawei suppliers special licenses to export

Huawei and its U.S.-based suppliers remain on eggshells as the Trump administration has yet to issue special permits allowing domestic companies to ship product to the Chinese tech manufacturer — this is going on as Huawei's temporary reprieve from an Commerce Department import ban is headed into its last week. Now, there's word from Bloomberg's sources that the White House is stalling on approving the permits.

Read More
65

Whatever OS Huawei has been working on, the company says it won't replace Android

If you've kept track of the political football in Washington that is Huawei, you'll know that the Trump administration, which supports the Chinese tech manufacturer, is at odds with Congress, which wants it disassociated with U.S. trade partners. The company has publicly been preparing contingency measures for a variety of situations, including replacement software for its smartphones should Android become unusable as a result of the ban. However, one of its board members has revealed that it has no intentions to leave Android, contradicting what executives have previously said about their plans.

Read More
57

Huawei forecasts catastrophic drop in phone sales and revenue

When the US added Huawei to the Entity List last month, it sparked a series of troubles for the Chinese manufacturer that are beginning to have significant consequences on its shipments and revenue. Indeed, the company has been banned from doing business with US organizations, which means it had to stop its working relationships with chip manufacturers and even Google.

Although Huawei tried to reassure markets with mitigation measures, including an in-house OS; these didn't seem to convince buyers its devices were a safe bet. Indeed, British carriers paused the introduction of the manufacturer's 5G products and its partner Foxconn was said to be halting some Huawei production lines earlier this month.

Read More
122

Foxconn reportedly pauses Huawei phone production

It's no secret Huawei has been going through some serious issues after it's been added to the US Entity List, preventing it from doing business with US companies. Indeed, most of the manufacturer's American partners were fast in cutting their ties with it, ranging from Google to chip manufacturers. ARM's decision to do the same also prevented the Chinese firm from continuing to build its Kirin chips, which were featured in most of its devices. Although Huawei is trying to overcome these woes with in-house software and working with Aptoide to put in place a Play Store replacement, it's struggling to convince the world about its viability.

Read More
72

Google reinstates Huawei entry on Android Q Beta site

After banning U.S. exporters from supplying product to Huawei, the Department of Commerce has put a hold to that ban for 90 days. But in some cases, the damage done to that company's supply chain relationships remains — most of the chip and software vendors that pulled away have stayed away. That said, the Chinese tech manufacturer remains a partner with Google in delivering the Android Q Beta program to its constituent developers. While Google decided to pull acknowledgement of Huawei's participation on its webpage last week, it has since reversed that decision.

Read More
116

[Update: Chip supplier not worried] Future of Huawei’s Kirin chips threatened as ARM ceases working relationship with the company

Just a few days after the US added Huawei to its "Entity List," things are continuing to go south for the Chinese manufacturer. The demise began with Google announcing it would put an end to its partnership with the company, and continued with major chip manufacturers blacklisting it. Although Huawei is trying to mitigate the first issue by working on an in-house operating system, hardware related bans are much more complex to overcome. To make things worse, ARM has just asked its employees to stop working with the Chinese tech giant, which puts the company's Kirin chips at risk.

Read More