Android Police

Articles Tagged:

huawei ban

117

I tried to use an Honor phone without Google's apps — and it did not go well

By now you’re probably familiar with the Huawei ban. Back in May, as part of the US government’s pointless trade war with China, Huawei was put on an “entity list” preventing American companies from doing business with the Chinese giant. As a result, Huawei lost access to Intel and Qualcomm’s chips, Microsoft and Google’s software — like Windows and Google Mobile Services (GMS) — and much more US tech.

Huawei mostly makes phones using its own Kirin processors, so losing access to Qualcomm’s hardware isn’t a huge issue. The company can also continue using Android since it’s open source. But losing access to GMS means new Huawei phones cannot run Google’s apps or services, or third party apps that use Google’s APIs — a deal breaker in many markets, including Europe, where Huawei handsets are extremely popular.

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28

Huawei ban may soon lift as US closes in on new Chinese trade deal

Huawei has had a tumultuous year. First came the government ban preventing the Chinese manufacturer from fraternizing with US-based businesses, effectively severing Huawei's license to use Google's apps and services on its popular Android phones. Then came rumors that Huawei was scrambling to release its own mobile operating system to replace Android, which has yet to materialize. Huawei has even forecasted a major revenue hit for the 2019 fiscal year, but a new report regarding the company's ban status yields a bit of light at the end of the tunnel.

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106

[Update: Mate X, too] Huawei Mate 30 may be forced to launch without Google apps and services

According to a report published today by Reuters, Huawei's upcoming Mate 30 series of phones may have to eschew Google's apps as a result of the trade ban imposed by the U.S. government. While the phone should still be able to run Android, given the free and open availability of the software, deeper integration with Google's apps and services like the Play Store and YouTube will be missing if an exemption can't be secured.

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22

Huawei gets another 90-day reprieve from the U.S. trade ban

Huawei is being given another 90-day reprieve by the U.S. government, following the Temporary General License (TGL) issued back in May. That provides the company with three more months to continue purchasing goods from U.S. companies. While this extension might sound like a step towards dropping the Entity List import/export ban for good, the government is clear that the extra few months are merely meant to "afford consumers across America the necessary time to transition away from Huawei equipment."

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57

Huawei forecasts catastrophic drop in phone sales and revenue

When the US added Huawei to the Entity List last month, it sparked a series of troubles for the Chinese manufacturer that are beginning to have significant consequences on its shipments and revenue. Indeed, the company has been banned from doing business with US organizations, which means it had to stop its working relationships with chip manufacturers and even Google.

Although Huawei tried to reassure markets with mitigation measures, including an in-house OS; these didn't seem to convince buyers its devices were a safe bet. Indeed, British carriers paused the introduction of the manufacturer's 5G products and its partner Foxconn was said to be halting some Huawei production lines earlier this month.

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40

Something good finally comes out of the Huawei ban

The Huawei ban has been a nightmare for the company, with organizations ranging from Google to the Bluetooth SIG having been pressured into severing ties with it, but it's not all bad news — Facebook bloatware apps can no longer be pre-installed on Huawei devices, according to Reuters.

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122

Foxconn reportedly pauses Huawei phone production

It's no secret Huawei has been going through some serious issues after it's been added to the US Entity List, preventing it from doing business with US companies. Indeed, most of the manufacturer's American partners were fast in cutting their ties with it, ranging from Google to chip manufacturers. ARM's decision to do the same also prevented the Chinese firm from continuing to build its Kirin chips, which were featured in most of its devices. Although Huawei is trying to overcome these woes with in-house software and working with Aptoide to put in place a Play Store replacement, it's struggling to convince the world about its viability.

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76

Huawei has trademarked possible Android replacement 'Ark OS' in Europe

Huawei is in deep trouble ever since the US Department of Commerce has banned American companies from doing business with it. The implications are reaching far broader than being cut off from Android – issues include WiFi and Bluetooth certification, ARM licenses for CPUs, and more. However, the Chinese conglomerate has repeatedly stated that it has a backup OS in place which is supposed to roll out in fall (though rumors have been very contradictory about it). Now, we also have a possible name thanks to the European Union Intellectual Property Office: "Ark OS."

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175

Bluetooth could be the surprise assassin of Huawei's smartphone business

While there's been plenty of talk about the consequences of Google, ARM, Qualcomm, the SD Association, the Wi-Fi Alliance, carriers, and the USB-IF no longer working with Huawei, one company has been kept out of the discussion to date: the Bluetooth SIG.

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