Android Police

Articles Tagged:

hijack

23

Hackers are getting better at hijacking Google Assistant with inaudible ultrasonic commands

Hackers are getting better at hijacking Google Assistant with inaudible ultrasonic commands

Back in 2017, researchers in China reported on a clever way to access a digital assistant, like Google Assistant or Siri, by using inaudible ultrasonic sound waves. Now a new team at Washington University in St. Louis have been working on similar technology, and their version is even more capable (and scary) than the original.

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Your carrier will let basically any competent criminal hijack your phone number

Your carrier will let basically any competent criminal hijack your phone number

One of the key pieces to our digital identities, whether we like it or not, is our mobile phone number. You likely use it one way or another in a two-factor authentication login (you shouldn't). Thing is, as it's been demonstrated quite a few times, they can be easily hijacked in a few easy steps by malicious actors ringing up carriers' customer service representatives — many of whom are all too understanding in helping users out of what's supposedly a stressful situation. So, just how easy is it to steal someone's phone number on a prepaid network? Researchers at Princeton University say extremely so in a recently published whitepaper draft.

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20
Instagram Android App Susceptible To Session Hijacking Due To Unencrypted HTTP Transfers

Instagram Android App Susceptible To Session Hijacking Due To Unencrypted HTTP Transfers

Alert! Alert! If you use Instagram's Android app, complete strangers could be looking at your photos of appetizers and makeup techniques right now! ...which is kind of the point of Instagram, I suppose. But security researcher Mazin Ahmed discovered that the app uses standard HTTP to transmit photos, cookies, and authentication (including usernames and unique IDs), instead of the encrypted HTTPS protocol. As Mr. Mackie is so fond of saying, that's bad.

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Using a set of freely-available tools, Ahmed was able to hijack the app's connection from a PC on the same network and authenticate as the relevant user. It's a fairly standard technique for hackers, which is why most sites and services with any kind of log-in functionality usually use HTTPS by default, including Instagram's owner, Facebook.

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5
Research Team Creates "Clickjack Rootkit" For Android That Can Hijack Apps, Exploit User Input

Research Team Creates "Clickjack Rootkit" For Android That Can Hijack Apps, Exploit User Input

Xuxian Jiang, along with his research team at North Carolina State University, has cooked up a proof-of-concept "clickjack rootkit" which targets Android. The rootkit is unique not only in that it can function without a device restart, but also in that it targets Android's framework, not requiring deep modifications to the underlying firmware or kernel.

Clickjacking, for those unfamiliar, is a malicious technique typically used on the web to "trick" users into handing over control of their device or confidential information.

The researchers' rootkit, which can itself manipulate an infected device, works by hiding apps on a device, and redirecting app launches to said hidden apps.

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