Android Police

Articles Tagged:

guide

243

The ultimate guide for installing the Google Play Store on Amazon Fire tablets

Amazon's Fire tablets are incredibly popular, mostly because they're incredibly cheap. However, none of them come with access to the Google Play Store, which is how most Android devices download and install applications. Instead, Fire tablets come bundled with the Amazon Appstore, which has a much smaller library and lacks any Google-made apps and services. No YouTube, no Chrome, and so on.

The good news is that it's not incredibly difficult to install the Play Store on a Fire tablet, and the whole process can take as little time as 10 minutes. This complete guide for installing the Play Store on Fire tablets has detailed instructions for every model produced since 2014, with added troubleshooting steps if you run into issues.

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58

How to rip your movie collection to watch anywhere

Physical media has its time and its place, but in the era of ultra-fast home Wi-Fi and high-res smartphones and tablets, a Blu-Ray or DVD basically makes no sense for a lot of the ways we now consume content. While ripping your collection of discs to digital can be time-consuming and comes with a real cost (disk space), going through the trouble can get you something Netflix can't: permanent, go-anywhere access to your complete media collection that no one can take away.

In this guide, we'll show you how to get started ripping your DVDs and Blu-Rays, stripping the DRM protection, and converting them into more space-friendly and watchable formats for all of your devices.

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0

How to sideload any application on Sony smart TVs

Sony uses Android TV across all its smart TVs, which means you get a full-fledged operating system without extra boxes or streaming devices. Android TV also gives you access to the Google Play Store, a library of thousands of TV-optimized games and applications. However, sometimes the app you want might not be available through the Play Store — maybe Google hasn't approved it yet, or you want to install the latest updates before everyone else. That's where sideloading comes in.

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16

How to change your Android device's name on the Play Store, Google Assistant, and more

Every phone, tablet, smartwatch, TV, and other Android-powered device has a model name assigned to it by the manufacturer. The name shows up in a few different places, including the desktop Play Store website, Google Assistant, and Google's Find My Device tool. Sometimes the model name is easily recognizable (e.g. "Google Pixel 3" or "Nokia 7.2"), but in other cases, it can be an incomprehensible string of characters and numbers.

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155

Working from home? Get the most out of your old laptop by turning it into a Chromebook

Laptops are in short supply globally—especially cheap ones like Chromebooks. But if you have an older Windows 7, 8, or even Vista laptop sitting in a closet somewhere at home, it's possible you can convert it into a secure and relatively performant Chrome OS device with the use of a totally free tool. The benefits are obvious: your old laptop gets a new lease on life, and you don't spend any money. As long your laptop still basically works, it's entirely possible you can be up and running with Chrome OS using just a USB stick and the relatively simple instructions below in minutes.

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79

Going Google-less: How to install a custom Android ROM with no Google apps or services

Understandably, some people want to live their digital lives with as little Google as possible, and are willing to go to fairly extensive efforts to get the advertising juggernaut off all of their various devices. On Android, this can prove difficult: almost no smartphone on sale right ships Google-free, and of those that do, there are serious feature gaps to consider, among other things. Enter microG, a way to reduce your reliance on Google's apps, advertising, and tracking by using a de-Googled custom ROM. We'll show you what you need, how to get it set up, and what you need to know about using it.

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9

How to use a PS4 controller on an Android phone or tablet

The controller for Sony's PlayStation 4, the DualShock 4, is one of the most popular gamepads right now. It's even a great controller for people without PlayStation consoles, since it can also be used with gaming PCs and Android devices. That's right, you could be playing Fortnite, Minecraft, and plenty of other titles on your phone with physical controls with a PlayStation 4 controller.

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6

How to install the Google Play Store on any Android device

The Google Play Store is the main place to download apps and games on an Android device. While most phones and tablets that ship with Android already come with the Play Store, there are some exceptions — Amazon's Fire tablets, phones released in China, some e-readers, emulators, and so on.

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6

How to factory reset your Google Home, Nest Mini, Nest Hub, Chromecast, or other Assistant device

While smart speakers have rapidly become ubiquitous in many of our homes, there are practical things about them—like initiating a factory reset when you sell them—that just aren't intuitive without a bit of Googling. And since the Assistant (fortunately) won't abide your voice request to initiate one, that means this is one smart speaker and display feature that requires going hands-on. Fortunately, it's pretty easy in most cases for devices like Google Home, Nest Home, and Nest Hub.

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27

How to read all your local library's books on your phone or Kindle for free

Reading the news can be a bit of a drag at the moment, and spending money on more and more streaming subscriptions can really start to eat into your monthly budget. As more of us turn to a good book to escape reality, we may be starting to realize that books can be a bit expensive, especially for newer, in-demand titles. And with local libraries closed, our avenue for free literature seems to have gone away with them. But it hasn't, at least, for many: there's a little app called Libby, and as long as you have a library card and your library supports it, you may be able to freely access thousands of books straight from your phone or Kindle.

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