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Articles Tagged:

Google I/O

54

Google I/O 2018 schedule is up: New things for Wear, Chrome OS, Assistant, but no sign of TV or Auto yet

Google I/O 2018 schedule is up: New things for Wear, Chrome OS, Assistant, but no sign of TV or Auto yet

The Google I/O 2018 ticket sign up registration is now closed, but there's something else on the I/O website that should grab your interest: the event schedule is now up and you can see that there might be two main keynotes on May 8, one from 10am to 11:30pm and one from 12:45pm to 1:45pm. I don't think this format was used in the previous years: it used to be one long main keynote.

Aside from the main event, the schedule has a long list of sessions to look through just to try to gauge a bit what the next focus points for Google will be over the next year.

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22

[Update: Closed now] Google I/O 2018 registration is now open

[Update: Closed now] Google I/O 2018 registration is now open

Google revealed the location and dates of Google I/O 2018 last month. If you've been waiting to get your own tickets, now's your chance - registration is finally open to the general public.

Just like last year, I/O uses a raffle system, so you won't know for sure if you have a ticket until February 28. Your payment method will be pre-authorized once you register, but you will only be charged if you are selected. The ticket prices are identical to last year - $375 for students/teachers, and $1,150 for everyone else.

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26

Google I/O 2017 app's source code released on GitHub to demonstrate the newest, best practices for Android devs

Google I/O 2017 app's source code released on GitHub to demonstrate the newest, best practices for Android devs

Every year for the past few years, Google releases an app for I/O attendees. Then, a few months afterwards, the company uploads the app's source code to GitHub. This year's I/O app was aptly named "Google I/O 2017," and now, if you're an Android developer, you can go through its source code to see what new techniques you can implement into your own app(s).

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42

Here are all the Instant Apps announced at Google I/O

Here are all the Instant Apps announced at Google I/O

Instant Apps were announced one year ago at Google I/O 2016, but only now are they rolling out to a large amount of users. Now any developer can make instant Apps, and Google showed off a massive list of them at a session earlier today (seen above).

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20

[Update: Already live] Google is rolling out smart replies in Gmail

[Update: Already live] Google is rolling out smart replies in Gmail

One of the unique features of Google's Inbox mail application was smart replies. Inbox tries to predict what the message is about, and provides three quick replies. I'll admit, I don't use it much, but it's pretty nice if you're quickly exchanging messages.

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38

Kotlin is now an officially Google-supported language for Android app development

Kotlin is now an officially Google-supported language for Android app development

The I/O news is starting to turn to developer-centric topics, and one of the more significant things to come out of the keynote is an official declaration that Google is now officially supporting Kotlin as a first-class language for developing Android apps. Starting with Android Studio 3.0, Kotlin is included out-of-the-box, so there are no additional setup steps or add-ons to install.

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56

The emoji support library in Android O means your phone won't need OS updates for new emoji anymore

The emoji support library in Android O means your phone won't need OS updates for new emoji anymore

One of the more annoying aspects of owning a smartphone on a not fully-updated version of Android can be emoji. Not how they look, but which ones your device supports. If you're running an older OS version, you probably don't have the latest Unicode revision of the emoji character library, and that can lead to the infamous blank square issue.

With Android O, Google is going to solve this problem, even if in a less-than-ideal way.

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44

Everything that's been announced at Google I/O 2017 so far (continuously updated)

Everything that's been announced at Google I/O 2017 so far (continuously updated)

Google I/O 2017 is in full swing, and we're about halfway through the first day as I write this post. Even so, we've already had dozens of stories come out of Google's big developer conference, and we want to make sure you're able to find all of our coverage in one place. Google Home, Photos, Assistant, Android O, Daydream - all saw major announcements today, and we're just getting started. I'll break it down for you. I've bolded what I think are some of the more important stories out of I/O today.

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197

Blobs be gone: With Android O, Google completely redesigns its emoji again

Blobs be gone: With Android O, Google completely redesigns its emoji again

Android O is going to bring a lot of changes to our favorite mobile platform, and one of the most visible for those of us using Nexus and Pixel products will be the emoji: Google is completely redesigning them. Again.

The new emoji are teased over at Emojipedia, who got an exclusive look at the redesigned characters. If you want the tl;dr - they're more circular now.

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22

Suggested Sharing, Shared Libraries, and photo books in Google Photos utilize machine learning to group photos together

Suggested Sharing, Shared Libraries, and photo books in Google Photos utilize machine learning to group photos together

Google Photos is something many people use every day; the automatic backup feature is so convenient, and the free unlimited storage is a major selling point. At I/O 2017, Google unveiled three new features: Suggested Sharing, Shared Libraries, and photo books. All of these use Photos' excellent machine learning technology to group faces together.

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