Android Police

Articles Tagged:

Gesture navigation

88

Samsung's new gesture navigation solution actually looks quite promising

Gesture navigation is considered by some to be an important innovation in smartphone UX, not least because it removes the nav bar and allows for more content on the display. It's not easy to get it right, but Apple has done a pretty good job of it and Android OEMs like OnePlus have also had a good go (let's not waste our time discussing Google's Pixel abomination). Samsung's recently announced Galaxy A7 offers another new take on gesture nav, and it actually seems pretty good.

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310

[Update: Maybe not] The Pixel 3 will only have gesture navigation, with no option for standard nav buttons

As we all know by now, Google's implementation of gesture navigation is pretty lackluster. Given that it still takes up the same amount of space as the regular nav bar, it doesn't have any real benefits and just makes things confusing. You'll probably be disappointed to hear that the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL will ship with gesture navigation, and there won't be an option to use the standard three-button layout that's been part of Android for years.

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24

Android P DP4 introduces new rotation toggle icon, gives it more prominent placement in gesture nav

The original Android P developer preview added a neat rotation toggle that let you lock the screen into portrait or landscape when auto-rotate was disabled. Google has played around with how to present this feature, and the new dev preview makes the biggest change yet. The button has been completely redesigned, and it shows up in a different location (sometimes).

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86

Android P DP4 revises gesture navigation button design

Android P DP4 just debuted earlier today, and even on the fourth developer preview, Google is still adding new changes. We'd thought that the only new things we'd be seeing by now were stability and bug fixes, but apparently not. The gesture navigation introduced back in May has received a new back button in DP4.

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103

Android P's new Overview app switcher is part of the launcher

Android P DP2 introduced the very controversial gesture navigation during last week's Google I/O, and with it came a new interface for the app switcher (aka Overview or Recents). Instead of scrolling up and down to move between tiny cards of your open apps and swiping sideways to close them, you now scroll sideways between full snapshots of your open apps and swipe up to close one of them. One detail that slipped by us, though, is that this whole interface is now bundled with the Pixel Launcher, not the Android system.

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332

Android P's gesture navigation is bad, Google

When I used the iPhone X for a month, one of the things I most loved about the experience was Apple's gesture navigation model. It was simple and, once I'd become accustomed to it, extremely quick and natural to use. The bonus to Apple's approach is that it completely obviated the need for anything like software navigation keys, opening up more of the screen for content. The iPhone X also looks striking as a result - the edge-to-edge screen displays content from top to bottom - and it allowed Apple to keep the phone a more manageable size.

Google has now entered the gesture navigation fray, along with OEMs like Huawei, Motorola, OnePlus, and others that have been experimenting with alternative nav models for years now.

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139

Tip: Swiping high up on Android P's home button opens the app drawer (on the homescreen), quickly swiping to the side switches to the previous app

I think it's safe to say that gesture navigation in Android P's DP2 is quite divisive. Ever since it was leaked yesterday then officially announced, we've seen a variety of reactions going from complete disdain to an all-out welcoming embrace. Gestures are still an option, so if you don't like them, you can disable them. But if you do enjoy them and are just a little bit annoyed by a couple of their shortcomings, we have discovered two solutions to their most glaring problems.

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248

Gesture navigation officially announced for Android P

Earlier today, a leak revealed that the next Developer Preview for Android P would include iPhone X-like gesture navigation. Sure enough, Google has confirmed the feature at today's keynote presentation. The software nav buttons introduced in Android 3.0 Honeycomb are now gone, replaced with a swipeable bar at the bottom of the screen.

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319

Android needs to adopt gesture navigation sooner rather than later

It hardly seems that long, but nearly ten years ago, the world’s first Android smartphone was announced. Android in 2008 really was barely recognizable as the operating system we know and love today, and the way we navigated that operating system was pretty different, too.

The HTC G1, or Dream as it was known in some markets, was equipped with a slew of hard buttons and even a trackball (yes, a trackball), though it also offered a full touchscreen and a slide-out keyboard. At the time, Android didn’t have a standardized system navigation layout; the G1 had buttons for opening the dialer, ending a call, going home, a menu key, and a back key, along with the clickable trackball to use as a confirmation input.

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146

Google appears to be testing iPhone X-style gesture navigation in Android P

The way we navigate around Android's interface has changed a lot over the years, from the early days of physical buttons, to touch-sensitive capacitive keys, and now on-screen virtual buttons that dominate modern handsets. But even that may not be where things stay for too much longer, and a screenshot Google recently shared is now stirring up theories about a possible iPhone X-like gesture navigation interface for Android P.

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