Android Police

Articles Tagged:

Gesture navigation

...

Google mimics iOS navigation gestures with hidden features in Android Q Pixel launcher

Android Ice Cream Sandwich was the first version of the operating system to introduce virtual navigation keys to phones, allowing manufacturers to dismiss physical ones. Although some decided to wait much longer to implement these, — I'm looking at you, Samsung — almost all Android devices nowadays have finally abandoned traditional buttons in favor of on-screen input. With the introduction of the iPhone X, Apple wanted to maximize screen space and therefore designed an ingenious swiping-based navigation system, that didn't require the need for buttons. With Pie, Google took its stab at it, but didn't quite make up its mind between using keys or gestures and instead went for a combination of both.

Read More
...

Samsung pushes its One Hand Operation gesture nav app to the Play Store

When Android was first released, it relied on physical buttons for navigation. Later releases moved these to the bottom of the screen, but their function mostly remained the same. With Pie, Google introduced a new gesture-based navigation, which still relies on a back key. While Android Q is rumored to finally get rid of it, Samsung preferred to do things its own way by offering to swipe up from the bottom of the panel instead of using unnecessary real estate.

Although this approach is relevant, I personally prefer to swipe from the left edge of my screen to go back, just like you would on iOS, mainly because there's more room to do so and you don't have to reach all the way down to navigate.

Read More
...

Google might fix gesture navigation in Android Q by killing the back button

As you're probably aware, there are some pre-release builds of Android Q floating around out there. We've gotten some tidbits detailing potential features from those builds like a system-wide dark mode and a possible desktop UI. Now, XDA claims to have spotted the best change yet: Google could make a long overdue improvement to gesture navigation by killing the back button.

Read More
...

Google confirms gesture navigation is mandatory on the Pixel 3

One of the new features in Android 9 Pie is gesture navigation - the three software nav buttons introduced in Android 4.0 have been replaced by a 'pill' that you swipe back and forth. The new navigation method is optional on the Pixel and Pixel 2, but Google has now confirmed that Pixel 3 owners are stuck with it.

Read More
...

Samsung's new gesture navigation solution actually looks quite promising

Gesture navigation is considered by some to be an important innovation in smartphone UX, not least because it removes the nav bar and allows for more content on the display. It's not easy to get it right, but Apple has done a pretty good job of it and Android OEMs like OnePlus have also had a good go (let's not waste our time discussing Google's Pixel abomination). Samsung's recently announced Galaxy A7 offers another new take on gesture nav, and it actually seems pretty good.

Read More
...

[Update: Maybe not] The Pixel 3 will only have gesture navigation, with no option for standard nav buttons

As we all know by now, Google's implementation of gesture navigation is pretty lackluster. Given that it still takes up the same amount of space as the regular nav bar, it doesn't have any real benefits and just makes things confusing. You'll probably be disappointed to hear that the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL will ship with gesture navigation, and there won't be an option to use the standard three-button layout that's been part of Android for years.

Read More
...

Android P DP4 introduces new rotation toggle icon, gives it more prominent placement in gesture nav

The original Android P developer preview added a neat rotation toggle that let you lock the screen into portrait or landscape when auto-rotate was disabled. Google has played around with how to present this feature, and the new dev preview makes the biggest change yet. The button has been completely redesigned, and it shows up in a different location (sometimes).

Read More
...

Android P DP4 revises gesture navigation button design

Android P DP4 just debuted earlier today, and even on the fourth developer preview, Google is still adding new changes. We'd thought that the only new things we'd be seeing by now were stability and bug fixes, but apparently not. The gesture navigation introduced back in May has received a new back button in DP4.

Read More
...

Android P's new Overview app switcher is part of the launcher

Android P DP2 introduced the very controversial gesture navigation during last week's Google I/O, and with it came a new interface for the app switcher (aka Overview or Recents). Instead of scrolling up and down to move between tiny cards of your open apps and swiping sideways to close them, you now scroll sideways between full snapshots of your open apps and swipe up to close one of them. One detail that slipped by us, though, is that this whole interface is now bundled with the Pixel Launcher, not the Android system.

Read More
...

Android P's gesture navigation is bad, Google

When I used the iPhone X for a month, one of the things I most loved about the experience was Apple's gesture navigation model. It was simple and, once I'd become accustomed to it, extremely quick and natural to use. The bonus to Apple's approach is that it completely obviated the need for anything like software navigation keys, opening up more of the screen for content. The iPhone X also looks striking as a result - the edge-to-edge screen displays content from top to bottom - and it allowed Apple to keep the phone a more manageable size.

Google has now entered the gesture navigation fray, along with OEMs like Huawei, Motorola, OnePlus, and others that have been experimenting with alternative nav models for years now.

Read More