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fcc

43

[Update: Another LG watch appears] New LG Wear OS watch shows up at FCC

Documentation concerning a new Wear OS watch manufactured by LG has appeared on the Federal Communication Commission's website. The listing doesn't reveal a whole lot, but the watch is described as a "portable wrist device" with a model number of LM-W315. It's possible the filing is for LG's rumored "hybrid" watch that's said to feature both physical hands and an LCD display.

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Phone tracking firms LocationSmart and Securus under fire for data breaches

Securus Technologies is a Texas-based company, specializing in providing and monitoring calls to prison inmates. Securus came into the spotlight earlier this month, when a former Missouri sheriff was found using the company's service to repeatedly track people without a warrant. The New York Times reports that between 2014 and 2017, former sheriff Cory Hutcheson used the service at least 11 times, allegedly tracking a judge and members of the State Highway Patrol.

Securus obtains tracking information through a company called LocationSmart, which in turn has agreements with most U.S. carriers. Earlier this month, Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon wrote a letter to various carriers asking them to independently verify that these requests are made lawfully.

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44

FCC issues $120 million fine for massive neighbor spoofing operation

Ever got one of those annoying robocalls, but the number looked local or even familiar? Well, those of us that have might have some modicum of vindication. Yesterday, the FCC issued a $120 million fine to Adrian Abramovich, who was found to have made almost 100 million spoofed phone calls about a timeshare or other travel-related things.

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2

Google working to open recently-freed wireless spectrum for shared use

A big chunk of the 3.5GHz spectrum in the US—called Citizens Broadband Radio Service, or CBRS for short—is being opened up for use later this year. Originally used by the US military, the FCC decided in 2015 that the frequencies could be put to better, shared use without obstructing its current applications like Navy radar. And, according to Bloomberg, Google's building the systems that will allow for seamless use of these new frequencies.

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36

FCC warns consumers about "scourge" of scam robocalls and caller ID spoofers

The Federal Communications Commission wants you to know that it is fighting on the side of the average American consumer, and not just devoted to appeasing the likes of Comcast and Verizon, by taking on the existentially crucial issue of scammy phone calls. Sort of. Like, they're thinking about it.

Today, the FCC announced that it will hold a joint policy forum with the Federal Trade Commission on March 23 on the topic of illegal robocalls and what these agencies, along with "private sector solutions," can do to stop them. On April 23, they will co-host a "Technology Expo" on the same subject, highlighting "technologies, devices, and applications to minimize or eliminate the illegal robocalls consumers receive." I assume that's more of those private sector solutions.

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40

FCC officially publishes net neutrality repeal, opening the door for challenges in the courts and Senate [Update]

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) published its final rules gutting net neutrality today. But like most phone announcements these days, there were no real surprises. We all knew what was coming.

Why the actual publication of the repeal matters is because it is only now that states and internet freedom organizations can start taking legal action. Plus, now the Senate has 60 legislative days to block the FCC if it is so inclined, which would require help from Republican senators.

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AT&T files complaint over "unsubstantiated, false, and misleading claims" in T-Mobile holiday commercial

Back in December, T-Mobile uploaded a two minute-long short to its YouTube channel, in the style of classic stop-motion specials like Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. It mostly consists of T-Mobile CEO John Legere telling a story about how he saved the US wireless industry from the "abominable carriers." It's a mostly harmless video, but AT&T has decided to file a complaint with the National Advertising Division over it.

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45

Sony possibly making last-minute changes to upcoming flagship

Sony has maintained mostly the same design on its smartphones for years - a blocky shape, usually with a side fingerprint sensor and large bezels. While there are plenty of people content with that aesthetic (they are very vocal in our comments), there's no denying Sony's lineup is starting to look a bit dated, with 18:9 screens and small bezels becoming more common.

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77

Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9+ pass through FCC, confirming some minor details about the duo

Hot on the heels of last night's Galaxy S9 box leak, the S9/S9+ duo has passed through the US's FCC. Unfortunately, since these major companies know how impatient and clever us tech nerds can be, most of the information necessary to make it through the FCC has been obscured from the eyes of the common folk. There's still some information to be gleaned here, though.

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Your phone may now receive "Blue Alerts," indicating danger to law enforcement in your area


The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently announced the addition of a new alert program, Blue Alert, to the nation's emergency alerting systems. The new service is intended to notify the public of threats to law enforcement in real time. With the creation of a dedicated Blue Alert event code in the Emergency Alert System, state and local law enforcement will have the capability to push immediate warnings out to the public via broadcast, cable, and satellite providers, as well as to consumer smartphones through the Wireless Emergency Alert system.

Much like both the SILVER and AMBER alert programs, and utilizing the same notification system, Blue Alerts aim to warn the general public of threats to public safety and/or imminent danger.

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