Android Police

Articles Tagged:

fcc

79

Report: US to block China Mobile's application to enter US market

The US government has been growing increasingly critical (perhaps even paranoid) when it comes to the operation of Chinese companies in the US. Between the on-again-off-again ZTE snafu and Huawei's allegedly government-influenced issues with its US carrier deals, Chinese tech companies are running into progressively more problems doing business in the United States. This is just the start, though, as according to a recent report by Bloomberg, the FCC is set to deny China Mobile's application to provide telecommunications services in the US.

Read More
24

FCC confirms Galaxy Note 9 S Pen will have Bluetooth

Ever since its introduction, the S Pen has been the defining feature of the Galaxy Note series. Some users are so devoted to that stylus they won't even consider buying another phone. The S Pen hasn't changed much over the years, other than no longer getting stuck in the phone. Samsung seems to have something big planned for the Note 9, though. A new FCC report lists the S Pen as a Bluetooth device.

Read More
23

Samsung Galaxy Note9 and Galaxy Tab S4 pass through the FCC

The Galaxy Note and Tab S lines are both due for a refresh soon. The Note8 is almost a year old, and the Tab S3 is almost a year and a half. Luckily, the successors to those have just passed through the FCC, indicating that they're probably coming soon.

Read More
14

A much more powerful Samsung fast wireless charger just passed through the FCC

Wireless charging had always been dog-slow - that is, until Samsung introduced fast wireless charging alongside the Galaxy Note5 and Galaxy S6 edge+. The same tech is still being used in Samsung flagships nearly three years later, but it's still noticeably slower than wired fast charging. That might be about to change, though; a new Samsung fast wireless charger has just passed through the FCC, and it's a lot more powerful than the current ones.

Read More
7

Nokia 5.1 earns FCC approval on its way to the US

The Nokia 5.1 has been approved by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), paving the way for a launch in the United States. It appears four variants of the device are on the way, two of which have dual SIM card support. Here are all the details.

Read More
42

[Update: Another LG watch appears] New LG Wear OS watch shows up at FCC

Documentation concerning a new Wear OS watch manufactured by LG has appeared on the Federal Communication Commission's website. The listing doesn't reveal a whole lot, but the watch is described as a "portable wrist device" with a model number of LM-W315. It's possible the filing is for LG's rumored "hybrid" watch that's said to feature both physical hands and an LCD display.

Read More
33

Phone tracking firms LocationSmart and Securus under fire for data breaches

Securus Technologies is a Texas-based company, specializing in providing and monitoring calls to prison inmates. Securus came into the spotlight earlier this month, when a former Missouri sheriff was found using the company's service to repeatedly track people without a warrant. The New York Times reports that between 2014 and 2017, former sheriff Cory Hutcheson used the service at least 11 times, allegedly tracking a judge and members of the State Highway Patrol.

Securus obtains tracking information through a company called LocationSmart, which in turn has agreements with most U.S. carriers. Earlier this month, Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon wrote a letter to various carriers asking them to independently verify that these requests are made lawfully.

Read More
44

FCC issues $120 million fine for massive neighbor spoofing operation

Ever got one of those annoying robocalls, but the number looked local or even familiar? Well, those of us that have might have some modicum of vindication. Yesterday, the FCC issued a $120 million fine to Adrian Abramovich, who was found to have made almost 100 million spoofed phone calls about a timeshare or other travel-related things.

Read More
2

Google working to open recently-freed wireless spectrum for shared use

A big chunk of the 3.5GHz spectrum in the US—called Citizens Broadband Radio Service, or CBRS for short—is being opened up for use later this year. Originally used by the US military, the FCC decided in 2015 that the frequencies could be put to better, shared use without obstructing its current applications like Navy radar. And, according to Bloomberg, Google's building the systems that will allow for seamless use of these new frequencies.

Read More
33

FCC warns consumers about "scourge" of scam robocalls and caller ID spoofers

The Federal Communications Commission wants you to know that it is fighting on the side of the average American consumer, and not just devoted to appeasing the likes of Comcast and Verizon, by taking on the existentially crucial issue of scammy phone calls. Sort of. Like, they're thinking about it.

Today, the FCC announced that it will hold a joint policy forum with the Federal Trade Commission on March 23 on the topic of illegal robocalls and what these agencies, along with "private sector solutions," can do to stop them. On April 23, they will co-host a "Technology Expo" on the same subject, highlighting "technologies, devices, and applications to minimize or eliminate the illegal robocalls consumers receive." I assume that's more of those private sector solutions.

Read More