Android Police

Articles Tagged:

facepalm

22

Fail: Android Wear 2.0's Russian and Hungarian keyboards are missing letters, but a fix is coming soon

Something that Android Wear 1.x was sorely missing was support for on-screen keyboards. It just isn't ideal in some circumstances to have to talk to your watch. Naturally, one of the features people got most excited for in Wear 2.0 was the ability to type using a keyboard. However, it appears that some languages' keyboards have some missing characters.

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59

[Facepalm] Samsung forgets to renew domain, potentially putting millions of customers at risk of being hacked

Sometimes inaction can be just as dangerous as making a wrong move. That seems to be the case for Samsung, as it appears simply letting a domain expire could have left millions of its customers vulnerable to hackers. Luckily, a security researcher named João Gouveia noticed the potential problem and snapped up the domain before anyone with more nefarious intentions was able to grab it.

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62

[Facepalm, Shrug] WhatsApp adds plenty of new emojis from Android 7.1 including professions and gender equality

Emojis, there are thousands of them and yet you always seem to be looking for that one emoji that doesn't exist yet. Did we have to wait this long to have a facepalm or crossed fingers? I guess we did. Anyway, let's skip the pointless blabber and go straight to the point: WhatsApp has new emojis on Android.

Regardless of which version of Android you're using, WhatsApp 2.17.44 beta (APK Mirror) has implemented the font images to properly display plenty of new emojis that are found in Unicode 9.0 and Emoji 4.0. If that sounds like jargon to you, you should know that in layman terms, they're all the new emojis found in iOS 10.2.

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156

[Shrug, Facepalm] For The First Time Ever, Android Supports More Emoji Than iOS Does

For a long, long time, emoji support on Android has been playing catch-up with iOS — sometimes lagging behind by as much as several years. In many cases, characters sent from another device (such as an iPhone) wouldn't display at all on Android, leaving a lot of information lost in translation. Even the few characters that did render were often depicted differently: if you've been on Android since the days of Jelly Bean, you probably remember those peculiar little monochrome Bugdroids that Google used in lieu of smiley faces.

A lot has changed since then: emoji on Android have gained some color, they more closely match the samples from the Unicode Standard, and they've grown to include several hundred different characters.

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