Android Police

Articles Tagged:

European Union

137

Google says Android provides choice, plans to appeal EU antitrust fine

This morning, Google was hit with an enormous $5.06 billion fine for what the European Commission considers to be anti-competitive practices — specifically, those that push users toward Google's own apps and services. CEO Sundar Pichai has penned a response that outlines where the company disagrees, pointing out the ease with which users can install alternatives to Google's pre-loaded apps, and making clear that the company plans to appeal the Commission's decision.

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32

Warp Charge may be OnePlus' new name for Dash Charge, following trademark mishaps

The folks over at the Dutch site Mobielkopen have spotted a trademark application in the EU for "Warp Charge," filed on behalf of OnePlus. Presumably, this new name is set to replace Dash Charge, after OnePlus previously failed to secure it as an exclusive trademark in the EU. 

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111

Alternative app store Aptoide has filed an antitrust complaint against Google

Google Play Protect is meant to keep nefarious apps off users' devices. Alternative app marketplace Aptoide has been flagged as such an app, according to a complaint the company has filed with the European Commission. Play Protect is reportedly cautioning some users that Aptoide is potentially harmful, and preventing the store from downloading apps for those who don't heed the warning.

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248

Google may face another EU antitrust fine next month

Last year, the European Union issued Google a $2.7 billion fine after the company was found guilty prioritizing its own shopping results over those from competitors. According to Reuters, Google is in hot water yet again, as the company is expected to be hit with another major EU fine.

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125

The GDPR goes into effect on Friday, here’s how it will affect you

Unless you've been living under a rock for the past few weeks, you'll have noticed the barrage of emails from companies notifying you of changes to their privacy policy and terms of service. That's no coincidence, of course: on Friday, May 25, a sweeping new legislation, which deals with data privacy and how companies handle an individual's personal data, will go into effect in the European Union. The regulation, called the General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR for short, grants individuals a series of rights concerning their personal data, and stipulates a number of duties companies have regarding how that data is processed.

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61

Google expands Family Link to 26 EU countries, now available in 37 countries in total

People in all countries have kids, so it's a bit disheartening when a feature launches for families and it's limited to the US. That was the story with Family Link last year, which was only available in the US at first. However, the parental control service started expanding shortly after, adding Australia, New Zealand, and Ireland, then Canada this past February. We might have missed the memo too, because it added a few more countries between then and now (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Japan, Mexico, UK). That made the total eleven, but now Family Link is expanding to 26 new countries, all in the EU.

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69

OnePlus may have to come up with a new name for Dash Charge, thanks to Amazon

One staple of OnePlus phones over the years has been 'Dash Charge,' the company's proprietary fast charging technology. The OnePlus 3 was first to include it, allowing the phone to charge two-thirds of the battery in roughly 30 minutes. If you watched the OnePlus 6 announcement live stream, you may have noticed that Dash Charge wasn't mentioned once - and there's a reason for that.

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30

Facebook is making global privacy changes based on EU data legislation

Facebook announced yesterday that it's going to be making policy changes for users around the world based on the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Although GDPR doesn't take effect until May 25, Facebook says it's rolling out the changes in Europe this week, with other regions following later.

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38

Google loses 'right to be forgotten' case, opens door for more requests to have unflattering search results delisted

If you screw up in a way that gets any sort of media attention, chances are you won't like what you see when you run a query for your name on Google. And those unflattering search results could have far-reaching implications for your livelihood. Two businessmen in the UK didn't like some results that turned up when their names were searched for on Google, so they took the company to the High Court of Justice based on the "right to be forgotten" precedent set by the Court of Justice of the European Union in 2014. One of the men won, while the other lost and was granted an appeal.

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54

EU residents now have access to the same online content anywhere in the EU as they do back home, but that's not necessarily a good thing

Anyone who's traveled to another country knows how frustrating it is to be geoblocked from streaming content that's available back at home. Due to licensing restrictions, content providers like Netflix aren't always able to provide the same viewing experience across different countries, and so some countries get access to a worse content library than others. Hypothetically, this shouldn't happen within the European Common Market (to which the European Union belongs), which seeks to "guarantee the free movement of goods, capital, services, and labour," but in reality there's always some gap between theory and practice. However, that begins to change with the EU's Cross-border portability of online content services policy, which went into effect yesterday.

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