Android Police

Articles Tagged:

EU

19

Google's Fitbit acquisition is being criticized for privacy and competition concerns

Google set out to acquire fitness company Fitbit in November of last year, but the deal hasn't gone through all the required regulatory approvals yet. There have been concerns that the acquisition could lead to reduced competition and Google extending its apparatus of data-collecting for targeted advertisements, and now advocacy groups around the world are urging governments to closely investigate the deal.

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30

EU hopes to bring 'right to repair' to phones, tablets, and laptops

The EU is hoping to enact its own "right to repair" for phones, tablets, and laptops in the region by 2021. Details are very sparse right now, and this goal only been revealed as one component of the so-called Circular Economy Action Plan, a part of the European Green Deal, a roadmap that hopes to make the region carbon neutral by 2050.

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70

Google users in post-Brexit UK to lose GDPR privacy protections

Just when you think the post-Brexit situation can't get any worse for us poor sods in the UK, another depressing tidbit rears its ugly head. This time, it's news that Google users in England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland will no longer be protected by GDPR and will instead be at the mercy of the privacy regulations of the United States.

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259

EU to consider mandatory common charger for smartphones, paving the way for USB-C domination (Update: Vote passed)

The European Union will soon hold a vote to decide if it will enforce a mandatory, universal charging connector for all smartphones and other similar, small electronic devices. Arguments in favor of the new legislation include a reduction of e-waste and easy, interoperable charging for end-users. The introduction of USB Type-C has energized standardization talks as it incorporates many of the advantages (reversibility of connection, data transmission rates, and charging speeds) used to justify the existence of proprietary charging connectors.

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44

Five-year ban on facial recognition being considered in the EU

According to a report by Reuters, the European Union Commission is considering a ban on facial recognition technology in public areas for up to five years. The measure is intended to curb privacy violations, give lawmakers time to protect citizens from being cataloged illegally, and oppose the recent push by companies to enhance and improve-upon recognition tech.

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36

Google halts Assistant recording transcription in the EU for at least three months

Just a few weeks ago, a Belgian news service claimed Google was eavesdropping on users by listening to their private conversations. The company uses human employees to transcribe Assistant voice recordings to help it better understand what they're saying, and it turned out that one of these contractors leaked the material to the press. The controversy has led the Hamburg Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information (HmbBfDI) to start a procedure prohibiting Google from continuing to manually audit these recordings.

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75

[Update: Rolling out] Google introduces Android search and browser app choices for users in Europe

In the wake of the $5 billion antitrust fine it received from the European Commission last year, Google laid out plans to prompt Android users in Europe to choose a different default search or browser app. In a new blog post, Product Management Director Paul Gennai introduces the changes that will come as part of an imminent Google Play Store update.

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40

Alphabet disappoints investors with 17% revenue growth in Q1

Investors are reeling after Alphabet posted a 17% year-over-year gain in revenues, its slowest growth in 3 years. In its earnings report for the first quarter, the company underlined monetization challenges across Google and YouTube alongside the latest large fine it has had to deal with from the European Commission. In the end, the company achieved operating income of $6.6 billion, down 13%.

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14

New EU rules demand more transparency, fairness in online marketplaces from Google, Amazon, and others

As a result of new European Commission rules around the transparency of online platforms, Google already outlined planned improvements to its developer relations and communication about Play Store policy compliance. However, there are wider implications for Google, Amazon, Facebook, and others as the rules governing digital practices were approved on Wednesday.

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118

The European Parliament votes in favor of new copyright law potentially taking away our memes

The European Parliament voted in favor of reforming the (admittedly due to be adjusted) copyright law in Europe. By itself, the new law isn't that controversial and will actually help creators and journalists get their fair share of income from big online players like YouTube and Google News. But don't put your torchlights and pitchforks down just yet. The directive might lead big platforms to implement upload filters to catch copyright infringement before content is published — which could possibly kill GIFs and memes.

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