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EU

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EU planning yet another Google antitrust fine, this time targeting AdSense

Google just can't catch a break in Europe. The US company has been fined $7.6 billion in the last few years over Android and Search practices, and now the EU is preparing a new penalty regarding what it views as anticompetitive AdSense contracts.

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Google is testing stripped-down news results that comply with imminent new EU copyright law

In September 2018, the European Parliament approved new copyright legislation that could change the way the internet works forever. One aspect of the new directive would force websites to pay for snippets they use from an external source, and Google is wisely already testing a stripped-down version of its news search results in anticipation of the law change.

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Google could face additional legal action in Europe over activity and location tracking

It's been a tough year for Google in Europe, and it doesn't look to be getting any better. The Mountain View company was slapped with a record $5 billion antitrust fine by the EU Commission this summer, and now it could be in hot water once again due to its location and online activity tracking practices.

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Google News might shut down in Europe over prospective EU 'link tax'

Europe's new digital copyright legislation has raised no shortage of concerns from business and consumer rights advocates alike. The severe new regulations include what critics have dubbed a "link tax" that would require most medium to large online platforms to pay copyright holders for reproducing even small snippets of text (though a few "individual words" is fine). This, of course, is at the core of Google News, and Google is adamant that it may shut down its news aggregation app in Europe if the EU does not alter the phrasing of its legislation.

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Google apps may cost EU phone makers as much as $40 per phone

Two days ago, Google unveiled new licensing terms for Android phones and tablets in the European Union, following the EU's record $5 billion fine. Device manufacturers can now sell phones with heavily-modified builds of Android while also producing normal Android devices with the Play Store, and some apps (like Chrome and Google Search) are now separate licenses. According to a report from The Verge, device makers are still strongly incentivized to ship Search and Chrome, or they could pay as much as $40 per device for access to the Play Store.

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Google is splitting up Chrome, Search, and Android for the European Union

Google Search has been a key component of Android since the OS was first released, and Chrome has become increasingly important in recent years. All three products are now intertwined, but the European Union wants them to be separate. Google recently was hit with a $5 billion fine from the EU, and to avoid more fines while the company challenges the EU in court, it is now complying with new regulatory rules.

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Google challenges record $5 billion EU fine in Android antitrust case

Back in July, the European Commission handed out its largest fine ever — 4.34 billion euros ($5 billion) to Google over antitrust charges. The Commission asserted that Google abused Android's market dominance, using it to hinder competition. Google's CEO Sundar Pichai immediately responded that Android has "created more choice for everyone, not less," and promised to appeal. Several months later, the formal challenge is now submitted.

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Google hit with record $5 billion Android antitrust fine by EU

The amount Google must pay the European Commission for its latest antitrust fine has now been revealed as a record 4.34 billion euros ($5.06 billion). That figure dwarfs the $2.7 billion fine Google previously received for giving preferential treatment to its own shopping comparison tools in searches.

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Warp Charge may be OnePlus' new name for Dash Charge, following trademark mishaps

The folks over at the Dutch site Mobielkopen have spotted a trademark application in the EU for "Warp Charge," filed on behalf of OnePlus. Presumably, this new name is set to replace Dash Charge, after OnePlus previously failed to secure it as an exclusive trademark in the EU. 

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European Parliament votes down draconian copyright reform plan

Last month, the EU Committee on Legal Affairs (which somehow works out to the initialism JURI) voted in favor of a new copyright reform plan called the EU Copyright Directive, sending it to a parliamentary vote. On its face, the idea of copyright reform is good considering how old many governments' legislation on the subject is, but two parts of the plan—Article 11 and Article 13—were a bit draconian in their perspective. Thankfully, the European Parliament has sent the whole idea back to be reworked.

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