Android Police

Articles Tagged:

editorial

167

Opinion: Big phones are fine but let's not go nuts, Samsung

Even if they've been arriving for plenty of folks early, today is technically Galaxy S20 day, and I've been excitedly playing with the Galaxy S20 Ultra that just landed at my own front door. For our full thoughts, you can check out the Android Police review, but I feel the need to reiterate one rather large detail to any of our readers that might still be waiting to pick one up: Even if you think you're fine with "big" phones, the Galaxy S20 Ultra is seriously on another level.

Read More
75

America isn't ready for 5G, even if our phones are

5G will be the cause of transformative, disruptive changes across our world. At least, that was the promise. As fifth-generation wireless networks begin rolling out across the globe in 2020, though, the world's richest economy feels further behind than ever in the race to deploy new spectrum and networks to accommodate this major technical shift. And that trend shows few signs of letting up for years to come.

While American telecom operators AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint all have grand visions and big plans for 5G here in the US, none currently have the ability to deploy broad 5G networks that will be both comparable in size to and significantly more performant than their existing advanced 4G LTE networks.

Read More
98

I wish all music and audio apps on Android wouldn't stop playback when swiped away

Several years ago, developers of music players on Android had to implement a persistent notification in order to keep their app running and music playing even when users switched to another app. With better memory management and more available RAM on modern phones, this isn't a concern anymore, and most devs have forgotten about that commodity. That has had one annoying consequence on several audio apps: If you mistakenly swipe them away, your music or podcasts or audiobooks stop playing.

Read More
91

We'll probably see phone launch delays and shortages this year because of coronavirus

Thanks to COVID-19, aka the coronavirus, we've already seen major events in the mobile tech news space canceled. Factories across China have also been closing, seriously affecting supply chains, and manufacturers outside of the country are being affected. As fears of the virus and its impact continue to wreak havoc on the world economy, I think there's a good chance we'll see phone delays and shortages later this year.

Read More
221

The Galaxy S20 spells the end of the headphone jack for Android

Announced just earlier today, Samsung's Galaxy S20 series of phones don't have a headphone jack. This isn't the first flagship device from Samsung to skip out on the trusty, universal 3.5mm connector — the Galaxy Note10 holds that honor — but this is a much bigger deal. The Note series may be breaking sales records, but the "base" Galaxy S is the Samsung phone. For many customers, it's Android's official ambassador in the mobile world, representing the default experience, and the fact that it just lost the dependable headphone jack probably spells the eventual end of the connector for all Android phones everywhere, forever.

Read More
309

Android's notification shade is slowly ruining face ID on my Pixel 4

Let me preface this post by saying that I love Android's notification shade. I love the toggles for things like airplane mode and dark theme, I love the platform's increasingly rich and smart notification quick actions, notification bundling, and just how Android handles notifications in general. But after three months of using the Pixel 4 XL, I've come to an increasingly annoying realization: the notification shade is having absolutely ruinous effects on the phone's facial recognition performance, something I've never experienced on the iPhone. And the simple reason is fingerprints.

Sensors that have to see things don't like fingerprints, for obvious reasons.

Read More
233

The Pixel 4a is putting Google in an unwinnable war — with itself

I don't think it meant to, but Google has backed itself into a corner with the anticipated Pixel 4a. The previous Pixel 3a was a smash-hit of a phone, doubling the company's phone sales amid some serious troubles. The 3a was so great it even earned our 2019 Smartphone of the Year accolade over the company's "flagship" Pixel 4 series. But based on what we've heard so far, I think the upcoming Pixel 4a could be a disaster for Google.

Read More
159

It looks like OnePlus is killing its pop-up camera, and that's a bummer

When the first OnePlus 7 Pro renders trickled out, showing off what appeared to be a pop-out camera mechanism, even I was critical of the concept. External moving parts on a device that suffers as much abuse as a phone seemed like a design that was destined to fail, even in just a mechanical sense.

Well, I'm not afraid to say that I was entirely wrong. OnePlus' pop-up selfie camera has proven to be a fantastic idea, and I'm upset it looks like OnePlus' next high-end "Pro" phone won't get one.

Read More
472

Chrome OS has stalled out

Nearly ten years ago, Google shipped an unassuming, totally unbranded laptop to a large group of journalists and tech enthusiasts as part of a 60,000 unit pilot program. That laptop was the CR-48, and it was designed to showcase a project Google had been working on internally for well over a year. It was called Chrome OS.

I was among the first of those lucky folks to receive a CR-48, and I used it as much as humanly possible for almost a year. It was kind of the worst: constant crashes, an insanely slow single-core Intel Atom processor, and questionable build quality would make it clear to anyone that it was very much a product built for dogfooding, not as a replacement for your Windows or Mac notebook.

Read More
116

It's almost 2020 and Gmail still doesn't have Inbox's bundles, which Google promised back in 2018

Google announced that it was killing Inbox all the way back in 2018. Though its death would ultimately be delayed until April of 2019, the news still hit hard for those that had grown dependent on the service's many exclusive email-managing tools — especially "bundling," which automatically sorted emails into adaptive categories for easy organization. In 2018, Google said that some of Inbox's features, including bundling, would be coming to Gmail, making our forced migration a little easier. But here we are a mere day from 2020, and Gmail still doesn't have it.

Read More
Mastodon