Android Police

Articles Tagged:

domain name

4

Registration for Google's .dev domains begins January 2019

As the number of available .com domains continues to decline, alternative domain endings are becoming more popular. Many developers (including yours truly) prefer to use .io domains for personal sites and projects, as a nod to "I/O" being the abbreviation for "input/output," but now Google is working on a new ending specifically for those people — .dev.

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36

How to make Android use the DNS server of your choice

It's not a huge stretch to say that without the domain name system, the internet as we know it would be practically unusable. With domain names being as important as they are, the servers we use to look them up form a critical part of our internet experience. For users who would like a little more control over how their phones resolve domain names, we're here to talk about what you can do to configure Android to work with the domain name server of your choice.

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26

OnePlus finally buys the website address it should have had all along

Most reputable sites on the internet are registered under the .com top-level domain. For what amounts to essentially meaningless historic reasons, people will generally agree that a domain that ends in .com feels more official than one ending in, say, .net or .biz. Of course, as more and more people and businesses come online, it becomes harder and harder to grab a relevant domain name — let alone one that ends in .com — and so you're often forced to settle for second best.

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25

Google Is .app-y About Purchasing The .app Top Level Domain Name For $25 Million

$25 Million. That's a lot of money for a little appendage that comes after a website's name. But Google saw potential in the tri-letter combo of .app and has finally won the ICANN's auction for the top level domain. This auction follows many other high-profile ones, where Dot Tech nabbed .tech for $6.7 Million (allegedly against Google), and Amazon grabbed .buy for almost $5 Million and .spot for $2.2 Million. By comparison, Google's auction has gone a lot higher, but it's understandable given the current interest in applications and our culture of Internet services.

However, this isn't Google's only top level domain — the company already has a few to its name like .ads.eat.fly, which aren't yet open to the public.

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21

[Ding Dong] Patent Troll Lodsys Is Finally (Probably) Dead After Its Domain Has Expired

If you follow patent litigation news, the name "Lodsys" has the same kind of weight as, say, Kim Jong Un or Robert Ford: when you see it, you just know something crazy is going on. But it looks like the legendary patent troll has fallen on hard times, as its website domain has been allowed to expire. The domain is currently being held by Register.com, which has not re-listed it for sale. Perhaps the one-man company and overly eager patent holder and his lawyers have run out of lawsuits - we can only hope.

ha ha

If you're not familiar with Lodsys, it is (or perhaps was) a Texas-based LLC formed exclusively for the holding and "protection" of four US patents originally awarded to one Daniel Abelow.

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12

Google Wrests Controls Of GooglePlay.Com From Squatter

After what was a pretty obvious application of the ICANN anti-squatting policy, it seems Google has now gained control of GooglePlay.com from an ad-serving Japanese squatter. Google filed a complaint under ICANN anti-squatting regulations, and after the case's short stint at the National Arbitration Forum (a non-court but legally binding decision-making body in the US), Google now shows as the registrant of GooglePlay.com.

A quick 'whois' of the domain yields the following:

Registrant Name: DNS Admin
Registrant Organization: Google Inc.
Registrant Street1: 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway
Registrant Street2: 
Registrant City: Mountain View
Registrant State: California
Registrant Postal Code: 94043
Registrant Country: US
Registrant Phone: 16506234000
Registrant Fax: 
Registrant Email: [email protected]

While the page in question still loads, it shows that the domain has been seized (according to Google Translate), and a change in registrant information usually indicates that either the squatter has given up the domain freely, or a decision has been reached and the domain seized by ICANN, beginning the process of transfer of ownership.

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29

Google Attempting To Seize GooglePlay.com With ICANN's Help, Will Probably Win, Here's Why

Cybersquatting, one of the more profitable forms of trolling, is nothing new to anyone familiar with the interwebs. In fact, it's often a source of some pretty funny disputes.

That gets us to today's story: a lot of people have noticed Google doesn't actually own GooglePlay.com (link goes to WhoIs.Net - not the actual page). Now, Google wants that page, and they've filed an ICANN dispute to get it.

It has become such a problem that the United States passed its own legislation to address the issue. The preferred method for dealing with these disputes, though, has been an arbitration body known as ICANN, whose decisions are binding around the world (mostly because they essentially control the Domain Name System).

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