Android Police

Articles Tagged:

data privacy

105

Signal vs Telegram: Which is the best privacy-focused WhatsApp alternative?

Signal vs Telegram: Which is the best privacy-focused WhatsApp alternative?

WhatsApp’s recent policy update has turned into a Pandora’s box for the app's parent firm, Facebook. The resulting exodus to rival platforms has sent shockwaves so strong that the company felt the need to run full front-page ads in several Indian dailies to make its case. While Facebook was busy doing some damage control, Telegram and Signal got to benefit from disgruntled users flocking en masse for their apps. Telegram emerged as the bigger winner of the two, having added over 25 million users in just three days (breaching the milestone of 500 million active users in the process).

Read More
14

The EU will allow Google to acquire Fitbit, but it's laying out some conditions

The EU will allow Google to acquire Fitbit, but it's laying out some conditions

It's been over a year since Google announced a $2.1 billion dollar deal to take over Fitbit, but it's been sitting in regulatory purgatory since then while the European Commission investigated the acquisition's affect on consumers and competitors. Now it looks like the EU has come to a conclusion that will allow the merger to move forward — providing that Google adheres to a set of specific guidelines about data privacy.

Read More
27

Surveillance companies are using mobile ads to obtain scarily accurate location data

Surveillance companies are using mobile ads to obtain scarily accurate location data

As people become more conscious of the importance of data privacy, dominoes are beginning to fall. Earlier this week, we learned that the company behind the X-Mode SDK had been caught selling customer location data to government contractors. Now a new report claims that overseas surveillance vendors are siphoning location data from smartphones with the help of mobile advertising tools.

Read More
9

Google adds new privacy protections for Chrome extensions

Google adds new privacy protections for Chrome extensions

It finally seems like people are becoming more aware about the importance of privacy online. Google has been working to improve its public image when it comes to user data privacy recently, including setting new privacy standards for Chrome extensions last year. Now the company is announcing an update to its developer policy that limits what developers of extensions can do with user data, as well as provides increased transparency regarding data-use practices.

Read More
16

OSOM plans to release its first privacy-focused product next year

OSOM plans to release its first privacy-focused product next year

Essential may not be around anymore, but that doesn't mean the talented team that made up the company is taking a break. Essential's head of R&D, Jason Keats, founded OSOM Products earlier this year with a handful of former employees on board. Now a new interview has revealed a glimpse into the future of OSOM — and it's a vision that's focused pretty much entirely on user privacy.

Read More
27

Searching Google for the wrong thing at the wrong time could put you on the police's radar

Searching Google for the wrong thing at the wrong time could put you on the police's radar

Google has been talking big about user privacy lately, but how far does that actually extend? Newly released court documents show that Google has given authorities broad swaths of information revealing not just an individual's search history, but disclosing everyone who has searched for specific keywords at the wrong time.

Read More
11

US technology companies will have to share user data with UK government under new agreement

US technology companies will have to share user data with UK government under new agreement

Privacy laws have been, and always will be, a hotly debated topic. Corporations, governments, and citizens all have differing opinions when it comes to how private users’ information should be. New legislation is set to be signed next month that will give the UK access to user data from Facebook, WhatsApp, and other US-based tech firms. This latest development is convoluted and sure to spark privacy fears.

Read More
79

Report: Android apps like TripAdvisor, Kayak, and Indeed shared data with Facebook without explicit consent

Report: Android apps like TripAdvisor, Kayak, and Indeed shared data with Facebook without explicit consent

Facebook doesn't exactly have a pristine reputation, but on a certain level it's surprising nonetheless when a new scandal concerning the social media giant breaks out - after all, just how many more surprises can it manage? The answer, it turns out, is many. A new report put out by campaign group Privacy International found that 20 out of 34 popular Android apps send data to Facebook without asking for permission. This echoes the findings of a previous report on health and dating apps.

Read More
45

Internal documents suggest Facebook might have exploited Android APIs to collect call and text data without permission

Internal documents suggest Facebook might have exploited Android APIs to collect call and text data without permission

This March reports broke that Facebook had been gathering call, SMS, and MMS metadata from Android app users for years with questionable levels of consent. Ars Technica suggested that Facebook was exploiting a loophole in Android to harvest call and SMS data without requesting the permission from users. Facebook responded that it was only collecting metadata through Facebook Lite and Messenger, both of which ask users for that permission during setup. The platform's integrity, however, has now been brought into question once more with revelations from internal emails released by the UK Parliament that show employees explicitly discussing how they might avoid any Android permissions request when accessing SMS and call history.

Read More
6

Google to embed user-friendly data privacy controls into Search, Maps, and more

Google to embed user-friendly data privacy controls into Search, Maps, and more

It seems like a new data privacy scandal crops up every day for some major tech company or another (okay, mostly Facebook) — but Google is working to opt out of that pattern. The tech giant has announced that it is building data privacy controls — and clear explanations of what it does with user data — into Search itself, on both desktop and mobile. Additionally, it notes that it'll give the same treatment to Maps next year, along with "many other Google products."

Read More
Mastodon