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contains ads

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The X-Files: Deep State is bad, even for a hidden object game

As any X-Files fan knows, the truth is out there. And well, the truth is The X-Files: Deep State is an appalling release. Even when you take into consideration that this is a casual free-to-play hidden object game, it's still bad when compared to any of the similar titles found within the genre.

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Ketchapp has taken The Tower and slapped an Assassin's Creed skin on it

Ketchapp has taken their popular casual tower building game The Tower and has slightly tweaked it for Assassin's Creed's 10th anniversary with the release of an all-new yet familiar title. This new game is known simply as The Tower Assassin's Creed, and you can expect all of the same tower building goodness of the original with the added benefit of having an Assasin's Creed character jumping off of these towers.

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Armor Games has remade their popular turn-based RPG 'Sonny,' and it is out on the Play Store

Armor Games has remade their popular flash-based strategy RPG Sonny and have released it on the Play Store. It contains all of the content found in the Steam release and is available for free with intermittent advertisements after every other battle. There are no extra purchases, no wait timers to artificially slow you down or any other shady free-to-play mechanics. What you see is what you get.

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The Play Store Starts Showing 'Contains Ads' Designation For Apps And Games

When it comes to ad placements inside applications and games, the more you know the better it is before you make a plunge and decide to check something out. Maybe you're willing to pay $5 or $10 for a good app or game, but you're appalled by the idea of also having to endure ads on top of that, or maybe you're just the kind of person who prefers free and ad-free software. Knowing beforehand if the app or game you're about to download contains ads can go a long way in setting the right expectations, that's the point David argued many years ago, and Google in all its wisdom decided to follow his advice (or you know, common sense).

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