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Articles Tagged:

chromebook

23

15 Chrome productivity extensions to work smarter, not harder, on your Chromebook

Extensions are among Google Chrome's most powerful tools, but it can be hard to weed out the ones that are actually good and helpful versus those that might be resource hogs or woefully outdated. And while web apps are great, extensions work across basically the entirety of the Chrome browser, making them, in a way, the "native" apps of Chromebooks. We know a thing or two about doing work on the web (hi, welcome to our blog!), and we all tend to use Google Chrome for a lot of that work. We've picked up a few extensions along the way that we think you're going to love, so here are 10 of our favorites for working smarter, not harder.

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6

Chromebooks managed through Google Family Link can now install any extensions

Earlier this month, Google whitelisted a few extensions for kids' Chromebooks managed via Family Link, like Zoom, Hangouts, and some educational tools — only installable with parental permission, of course. This makes life easier for those who need to rely on video conferences for learning during these stay-at-home times, but it's still a tiny selection. To improve the situation, Google is now testing support for all extensions on managed Chromebooks in Chrome OS 83+ (we tested using Dev 83 and 84).

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18

How to enable SD card storage for Android apps like Netflix or Plex on your Chromebook

Many Chromebooks, especially cheaper ones, have microSD card slots to augment relatively puny internal storage. However, because that microSD card slot is configured by default just to act as a piece of ejectable media by Chrome OS, it's not accessible to a key storage use case: Android apps. When you're rapidly filling up your Chromebook's remaining space with downloaded episodes from apps like Netflix or music from Spotify, it can start to become painfully obvious just how limited your laptop's internal storage is. Fortunately, there is a workaround.

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66

Should you buy a Chromebook?

With more and more people buying laptops to work or learn from home, a lot of folks are probably looking into the prospect of switching to a lighter, cheaper Chromebook instead of a traditional Windows or Mac laptop. Chromebooks come at a wide range of price points and with a variety of features, but the big question for most people is about Chrome OS itself. How hard is it to switch? What are Android apps like? Does Linux support really work, and how well? Do Chromebooks make good tablets? Can I use Firefox on one? We'll cover as much of that as we can in this post.

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119

Switching from MacBook to Chromebook: Is Chrome OS good enough?

Chrome OS often gets maligned as a platform that you can't do "real work" on, and in some cases, that's true. But sometimes, you don't need a computer that does absolutely everything, and that's why I decided to give switching to Chrome OS on my laptop a try. While I've retained my iMac as a proper workstation, my aging MacBook Air was due for an upgrade, and the opportunity to switch platforms presented itself. Could a simpler, cheaper Chromebook replace my MacBook for working on the go? While I found that the answer was decidedly "no" in some situations—and that simply adapting to Chrome OS and its limitations was a huge adjustment—I do think Chrome now has a place in my workflow, albeit one that is rather hit or miss.

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15

ASUS Chromebook Flip C436 review: Premium hardware, poor value

Chromebooks have gone through a rapid evolution over the past two years or so. High-end models like the Galaxy Chromebook, Acer Chromebook Spin 13, and Lenovo Yoga Chromebook C630 are bumping up against Windows ultrabooks in both hardware and price. At the same time, Chrome OS has expanded in functionality with features like Linux app support, better native printing, and improvements to tablet mode.

Asus revealed the Chromebook Flip C436 earlier this year, and while it's a great laptop (if you like Chrome OS) with fantastic performance, the incredibly high price makes it a tough recommendation.

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21

Chromebooks will now install some web apps from the Play Store, instead of their Android versions

Chrome OS can run both web applications and Android apps, but sometimes, the Android app for a service isn't quite as optimized for Chromebooks as the web app equivalent. Google has seemingly realized this, as it is experimenting with a new Play Store feature that installs Progressive Web Apps on Chromebooks instead of the Android app equivalents.

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8

YouTube adapts its website to large touchscreens like iPads and Chromebooks

If you have an Android tablet or an iPad, you've likely installed the native YouTube app on them to enjoy your videos. But for those of you who haven't, and for anyone who's browsing YouTube on a touch-enabled Chromebook or PC, you'll be glad to know the website is now better suited for touch interaction.

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14

Google now lets you install Zoom and a few other extensions on your child's Chromebook

With millions of children currently studying from home, and most likely using cheap computers like Chromebooks, glaring omissions in Chrome OS have come under the spotlight. For example, those who were using Family Link to manage their kids' Google accounts and Chromebooks noticed that they can't install any extensions on them. Maybe that was designed as a security measure, but it hindered the use of video conferencing tools like Zoom and Hangouts. Now that's changing.

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99

Samsung Galaxy Chromebook vs. Pixelbook Go: Which should you buy?

Samsung surprised us at CES this year with the Galaxy Chromebook, a high-end convertible Chrome OS laptop whose thin, angular body is awfully reminiscent the original Pixelbook. It's on sale today. But Google's got its own new laptop bearing the Pixel family name in the Pixelbook Go, which you can spec all the way up to a 4K display and Intel Core i7 processor. If you're on the hunt for a premium Chrome device, these two should be high on your list, but which should you buy? Let's discuss.

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