Android Police

Articles Tagged:

chrome 85

88

Chrome for Android is finally going 64-bit, giving it a speed boost in benchmarks

The first Android version to support 64-bit architecture was Android 5.0 Lollipop, introduced back in November 2014. Since then, more and more 64-bit processors shipped, and today, virtually all Android devices are capable of running 64-bit software (excluding one or two or more oddballs). However, Google Chrome has never made the jump and is only available in a 32-bit flavor, potentially leading to some unnecessary security and performance degradations. That's finally changing: Starting with Chrome 85, phones running Android 10 and higher will automatically receive a 64-bit version.

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27

Google confirms experiment to remove full address from URL bar in Chrome, details opt-out mechanism

Last week, Google began testing a new change in Chrome Dev/Canary 85, that hides the full address of the current page, only showing the website domain (e.g. "google.com") at all times. The move attracted a fair amount of backlash, and now, the company has revealed more details about its plans and how it will address criticism.

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94

Google resumes its senseless attack on the URL bar, hides full addresses on Chrome 85

Google has tried on and off for years to hide full URLs in Chrome's address bar, because apparently long web addresses are scary and evil. Despite the public backlash that came after every previous attempt, Google is pressing on with new plans to hide all parts of web addresses except the domain name.

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11

Chrome 85 will make drag and drop uploads much less frustrating

Anyone who has ever used a web browser on a desktop OS has probably come across this at some point: You want to drag and drop an image or another file onto a website to upload it, only to realize too late that the site doesn't support uploading that way — instead, the website gives way to a preview of the file you just let go of. In a worst-case scenario, you might even find all the forms you've filled in cleared. Thanks to Microsoft Edge developer Eric Lawrence, this will soon be a thing of the past: Starting with Chrome 85, a file you accidentally drop onto unsupported websites will open in a new tab instead.

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