Android Police

Articles Tagged:

censorship

55

Google's censored Chinese search engine Project Dragonfly is reportedly dead after internal conflict

When news first broke in August about Google's plans for a censored Chinese search engine, there was immediate backlash both internally and externally. As details regarding Project Dragonfly continued to leak over the ensuing months, that pushback only grew more vehement, with executives fielding questions on the subject from US senators and Google employees launching a petition decrying the project. Now, according to The Intercept, Dragonfly is effectively dead after a massive internal rift formed between the project and the company's privacy team.

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62

Employees petition Google to stop work on censored Chinese search engine Dragonfly

News of Google's censored Chinese search engine project Dragonfly has steadily leaked since August, angering many of the company's own employees - especially after the response that filtered down from the higher-ups was essentially: yes, we might compromise core values for business. A group of over 170 employees have now banded together to address the issue publicly with an article and petition posted on Medium in partnership with Amnesty International entitled "We are Google employees. Google must drop Dragonfly."

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57

Dragonfly memo details Google's tracking measures for Chinese search engine

Google's plans for a Chinese search and news service, known internally as Dragonfly, continue to leak and create controversy. In August, it was revealed that Google would soon reenter the Chinese marketplace, which Google CEO Sundar Pichai denied, calling it "an exploration stage." Then on Sept. 14th, it was reported that Google would track users using their phone number.

Now a new memo gives further details regarding the extent of Dragonfly's tracking. The memo was created and circulated internally by an engineer who was asked to work on the project. It details the methods in which Dragonfly tracks a user, first by requiring them to log in.

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24

Google reportedly plans to release a censored search app in China

Google is planning to release a censored version of its search app in China, according to a report from The Intercept. The project, apparently code-named Dragonfly, has been in development since last spring. The app will limit searches to exclude information not approved by the Chinese government, like results about sex or political dissidence.

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42

Google and Amazon are closing 'domain fronting' loopholes used to bypass web censorship

For years, governments around the world have tried to block various web services. This has often proved tricky in recent times, as the recent Telegram bans in Iran and Russia revealed. For example, Russia broke countless other sites while attempting to block Telegram, because they shared the same infrastructure (AWS, Google Cloud Messaging, etc).

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144

Russia attempts to block Telegram with all the restrained composure of a bull in a china shop

The global availability of smartphones and the app stores that house their software makes it as easy for developers to share their work with users down the street as those living on the other side of the world. And while we tend to feel that broad access to software is almost always a good thing, not everyone is going to agree, and sometimes all it takes is one government getting upset about one app to cause some serious fallout. That's pretty much what we're seeing right now, as Russia makes moves against Telegram that are already having some serious consequences.

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144

WhatsApp is now blocked in China

China has a long history of blocking or limiting access to websites, especially social networks and Western-owned sites. Wikipedia, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and many Google services are currently blocked in mainland China. WhatsApp has been partially-blocked in the past (for a while, video chats and some other functionality wasn't working), but now the entire service seems to be non-functional.

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10

The Tor Project's ooniprobe allows you to participate in the vigil against internet censorship

Experienced internet explorers will know about The Onion Router Project, and some of you may have even used it at one point (guilty). Regardless of your thoughts on it, Tor has always tried to stand for internet freedom. The organization frowns upon censorship and throttling, which is why it has released ooniprobe to help raise awareness for the issue.

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74

Amazon Reverses Decision: The Original 'Postal' Is Now Available On The Appstore For $1.99, Still MIA From The Google Play Store

Earlier this week we reported on Google's decision to refuse an Android port of the PC shooter Postal in the Google Play Store. Two days later, a representative of developer Running With Scissors told us that Amazon had done the same for the Amazon Appstore, and provided us with the rejection letters from both companies. Google refusing to allow the controversial shooter onto the Play Store is merely inconsistent; as we noted at the time, games with similar levels of violence like Grand Theft Auto III are easily available. But Amazon blocking the sale of the Android app, when the company sells the same game as a PC download, was just downright hypocritical.

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176

[Update: Amazon Too] Google Refuses To Allow Postal Game In The Play Store For 'Gratuitous Violence' - Apparently They Forgot About GTA, The Walking Dead, And Others

If you're below a certain age or simply not all that familiar with the history of video games, perhaps you haven't heard about Postal. Originally released for the PC in 1997, Postal was an isometric top-down shooter - think Contra with some better graphics.

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