Android Police

Articles Tagged:

cell

2

Google Search adds more AR 3D objects, including cell models and anatomy elements

Google presented AR objects in Search with much fanfare during its developer conference last year, and it probably would've loved to talk about additions and improvements during this year's I/O. With the event canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic, the company has instead shared some news on the feature via a blog post. In it, Google shows off new 3D objects, such as additional anatomic models and magnified views of cells. There are also new capabilities for the viewer.

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46

[Weekend Poll] Is A Carrier Move To Data-Only Service A Win Or Loss For Consumers?

This is the latest in our Weekend Poll series. For last week's, see Google + Motorola: A Match Made In Heaven, Or A Disaster Waiting To Happen?

A few days ago, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson revealed that the cellular industry would be moving towards data-only plans in the next few years, rather than the separated voice, message, and data system that is used today. Under the new system, voice and messages would be billed as data. The question, obviously, is at what rate they'd billed.

Initially, this may seem like a great idea for both parties. Obviously it allows carriers to get a handle on all the services their customers are using (such as Skype for calls rather than normal voice), as well as sneak in some "toll-free" data services.

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0

Eric Schmidt In HBR: "Preparing For The Big Mobile Revolution"

While only tangentially related to Android, a post on the Harvard Business Review by Eric Schmidt (the CEO of Google, in case you weren't aware) provides a glimpse of what he sees coming in the world of mobile technology. His post isn't especially long, and I'm not too keen on plagiarism, so here are Schmidt's three points:

  1. Focus on developing LTE networks
  2. Using mobile phones for commerce (to transfer money)
  3. Smartphone proliferation - put smartphones in the hands of the poor

While short, it's an interesting piece; certainly worth a read.

[Source: Harvard Business Review]

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8

Google Voice Now Supports Mobile Number Porting

Oh, Google, always so sneaky and humble. This go-round, they've quietly implemented support for mobile number porting into Google Voice, making the service even more convenient.

The process is fairly direct. After entering your mobile number, you agree to the various terms and conditions (it's nice that they list just 6 points that must be checked, rather than a 17-page agreement), and then enter in your account information. Once you've got everything all set, you simply check out, and they take over.

gvoice_port2

Anyone who's ever ported a number before knows that it's generally a pretty painless process; personally, when I ported my number from Verizon to Sprint, it literally took all of 5 minutes.

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9

Want To Know What Sprint 4G Cell Towers Look Like? Sprint Starts A "Behind The Scenes Of Major 4G Launches" Video Series

Ever wanted to know what exactly it takes to roll out a whole new cellular network? Sprint, being one of the first companies in the US to do it (well, Clearwire is doing all the leg work), today launched a new video series which will explore just what exactly it takes to provide a large metropolitan area with 4G coverage.

The first video, "Wiring up 4G in NYC: Rooftops," is out now, embedded below. In the video, Iyad Tarazi, vice president of Network and Development, shows what a 4G cell tower really looks like. I must, say, I was very much surprised by its miniature size, especially compared to the 3G cell tower right next to it.

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49

Google Phone (Android) Demo Of Streetview With Compass

This post and all its comments were migrated from Artem's personal blog beerpla.net when Android Police launched. If you would like to visit the original post there, please click here.

I think this is going to be really neat: you walk around the streets of San Francisco, for example, with your Android powered phone, en route to your destination 20 blocks away.

You whip out your phone, go to Google Maps, pull up the StreetView (remember this?), which zeroes in on your location using a built-in GPS, and then changes as you move the phone around using the built-in compass.

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