Android Police

Articles Tagged:

carrier aggregation

48

Qualcomm's insane new LTE modem is twice as fast as typical fiber - meet Snapdragon X24

Qualcomm's insane new LTE modem is twice as fast as typical fiber - meet Snapdragon X24

Qualcomm's new Snapdragon X24 LTE modem is the fastest, most advanced 4G chip on the planet. Or, at least, Qualcomm hopes it will be by the time it's in your next smartphone.

Based on a 7nm fabrication process (yes, seven nanometers), the X24 LTE modem is the world's first Category 20 LTE modem and supports an absolutely bonkers 2Gbps max download speed by aggregating up to seven carrier bands. It also uses advanced massive MIMO and Licensed Assisted Access tech to help achieve these figures. Aside from being the first commercial product announced to use a 7nm fab, the small process size should also make it Qualcomm's - and thus, quite likely the world's - most efficient LTE modem ever.

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96

Here's T-Mobile's full list of LTE Advanced and 'trifecta' markets

Here's T-Mobile's full list of LTE Advanced and 'trifecta' markets

The worst thing about the future is all the waiting it takes to get there. Those of us anticipating T-Mobile's new LTE-Advanced to go live have had to make do without an official list. Thankfully, just before the weekend, T-Mobile CTO Neville Ray tweeted the general location of all his company's active LTE-A sites. 

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205

T-Mobile announces new network technologies for faster speeds, takes a dump on Verizon, Sprint, and AT&T in the process

T-Mobile announces new network technologies for faster speeds, takes a dump on Verizon, Sprint, and AT&T in the process

Subtlety isn't the strong suit of T-Mobile's CEO and his press announcements, but this new release comes to us courtesy of the company's CTO, Neville Ray, who seems to be taking on the same blunt approach of the famous Legere.

T-Mobile, through Ray, announced new network technologies to improve the speeds of its network: 4x4MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) which doubles the number of data paths between your phone and the cell network, and 256QAM/64QAM (quadrature amplitude modulation) for faster bits transfers during downloads and uploads, respectively. 4x4MIMO is already available in 319 cities while 256QAM/64QAM is live in half T-Mo's network and will be on every network cell by the end of October.

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61
Sprint's 2x Carrier Aggregation Goes Live In Nearly 40 Markets Across The US

Sprint's 2x Carrier Aggregation Goes Live In Nearly 40 Markets Across The US

Sprint Spark Band 41 Carrier Aggregation is now active in over three dozen markets across the US. S4GRU broke down the news after a Sprint employee leaked an internal announcement onto Reddit. The blog, which exclusively covers Sprint 4G rollouts (yes, you can write about anything on the Internet), provides lists of the supported cities and devices.

Early test markets included Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, and Houston. Thirty-five more cities have joined in time for the initial launch.

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Carrier Aggregation is the first step of implementing LTE Advanced, offering higher peak data rates and a better experience for everyone overall. Things get pretty technical, but here's more of a breakdown if you're curious.

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41
Samsung Announces The Galaxy Note 4 LTE-A Tri-Band CA Model With Download Speeds Of Up To 300Mbps

Samsung Announces The Galaxy Note 4 LTE-A Tri-Band CA Model With Download Speeds Of Up To 300Mbps

There's no such thing as a connection that's too fast. Samsung seems to be following that sentiment with the latest variant of the Galaxy Note 4, officially announced this weekend. The new Note 4 has something called LTE Advanced Tri-Band Carrier Aggregation, which is a fancy way of saying that its mobile download speed is faster than just about anything else on the market. Samsung claims the phone can download files at a speed of 300mbps, faster than all but the most advanced wired connections.

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We'd show you the Galaxy Note 4 LTE-A Tri-Band CA, but Samsung didn't post a photo.

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