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Articles Tagged:

artwork

63

[Update: Culprit fired] Xiaomi stole artwork from a 3D artist commissioned by rival LG

There's a different perspective on copying and redistributing other people's work in China — in fact, copyright as we know it was only introduced to the country's legislation in the 80s. Companies still have a different culture around copying others' work, especially since copyright violations are often still considered minor misdemeanors there. However, companies should absolutely still adhere to appropriate laws internationally — which is why we're calling out Xiaomi here. It's been caught ripping off an artist's work to promote products on the landing page of its Spanish website (which has since been updated to remove the image) — the icing on the cake is that the stolen property was commissioned by Xiaomi's competitor LG.

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21

Muzei Updated To Version 2.0 With Android Wear Watch Face, Design Tweaks, And More

 

Roman Nurik's Muzei, the live wallpaper that puts art (or any other collection of images) front and center on your home screen, got a big update to version 2.0 today.

The most noticeable changes are in the app's interface, which has been updated for Lollipop. The design stays true to the experience many users are already familiar with, but adds some new touches, including a revised launcher icon, and a FAB for adding images to the "my photos" category.

Muzei has also added a slider for saturation in its advanced settings menu, an option to remove effects on the lock screen, improved panning for wide images, some bug fixes, and some awesome Android Wear integration including a watch face (contributed by Ian Lake) and better notifications when new artwork appears.

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6

Artist Works With Google To Create Interactive Sculpture Painted By Chrome Users

Artist Janet Echelman builds giant, living sculptures that respond to the elements around them. These massive works of art typically sway in the wind, flow with the water, or respond to light. This time, Echelman's work is interacting with Chrome. Her piece, built in collaboration with Google Creative Director Aaron Koblin, now descends over water and walkways from a Vancouver skyscraper, changing color in response to the input it receives from visitors on the ground.

Sculpture1 Sculpture2

Sculpture3

Echelman's sculpture is a 300-foot long web browser made of ultralight fibers stretched out against the sky. With the help of five high definition projectors mounted below, it displays the colors provided by a website running in Chrome on a smartphone or tablet.

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