Android Police

Articles Tagged:

AOSP

4

LineageOS 17.1 is official with theme engine, Lineage Recovery, and Pixel feature drop code

We already know which first few phones are receiving support for the brand-new Android 10-based LineageOS 17.1, but now, the open-source project has released a full changelog and shared why it has decided to make it an x.1 release. The new software is packed with additions such as a partial screenshot functionality, the spiritual successor to the CyanogenMod Theme Engine, Lineage Recovery, and many smaller changes.

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41

Googler mentions 'Pixel 5' in Android Open Source Project

It has been a mere four months since Google unveiled the Pixel 4, and it's already time to be on the lookout for Pixel 5 leaks. Over in the Android Open Source Project (AOSP), a Googler has added a seemingly innocuous comment that confirms what we already expected: Google is working on a Pixel 5.

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30

New 'ultra low power' mode spotted in Android source code, could be tied to future Pixels

A new, even lower-power mode may be coming to Android phones in the future. XDA Developers' Mishaal Rahman spotted a commit made to the AOSP (Android's source code), which adds a new "ultra-low power state" to future versions of Android, and circumstantial details indicate it might be destined for an upcoming Pixel phone.

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38

Google's new Android Flash Tool installs AOSP images on Pixels straight from your web browser

Google just released a new browser tool for developers that enjoy mucking about with AOSP (Android Open Source Project) test builds. It's called the Android Flash Tool, and it works almost entirely inside your browser, allowing you to quickly and easily pull down AOSP images and flash them to your phone. With it, developers can check app compatibility with AOSP changes, and folks mucking about in the Android source code can see their tweaks on a real device. Although it's pretty snazzy, it doesn't look like it will be any use to the root-and-ROM crowd (yet).

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13

Sony Xperia 5 bootloader becomes unlockable as it joins Open Devices program

Sony has managed to gain a lot of fans among developers thanks to its Open Devices program. It's an initiative that brings Android Open Source Project (AOSP) builds to some of the company's devices and allows developers to adapt and change the code. It also makes it easier to unlock the bootloader and install custom ROMs. Sony has announced that the latest phone to become part of the Open Devices program is the Xperia 5.

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29

Android 10 source code is now available on AOSP

While many people are enjoying — or lamenting — the upgrade to Android 10, there are some out there that are just as interested in the final source code. With each major release of Android, a huge code drop is made to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) with everything a developer needs to build the latest version of the OS. As of this morning, the code is now fully available and ready for consumption.

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32

Google beefs up Android RCS APIs in preparation for third-party messenger support

Google's efforts to bring RCS to the world haven't been as inspiring as many of us had hoped, largely due to slow adoption by carriers and some self-serving behavior on the part of certain OEMs (cough). However, some of this can also be attributed to limits in Android itself. To use RCS today, you have no choice in app selection — you're stuck using apps provided by your phone's OEM, be it Google, Samsung, LG, or another partner. Earlier this year, it looked like Google had added code to Android Q that would enable third party apps to support RCS, but that was disputed shortly after.

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6

[Update: ZenFone 4 Selfie too] ASUS ZenFone 4 Max receives AOSP Pie Beta

The ASUS ZenFone 4 Max only received an update to Android Oreo back in October, but the company is hard at work with keeping the phone updated. You can now download an AOSP beta without ZenUI for the device with the model name ZC554KL.

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51

ADB's backup and restore functionality will go away in future Android release

ADB is the main command line tool for interacting with Android devices. It can be used to sideload APKs, copy data, and more. Starting with Android 4.0 ICS, a feature to backup and restore applications (and their data) was added, but that functionality will be removed in a future Android release.

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89

[Update: Nope] Android Q may deliver RCS support to third-party apps, finally simplifying things at least a bit for consumers

RCS has taken years to gain widespread network support, and we're still suffering through carrier interoperability issues. The current landscape is nothing if not entirely overcomplicated to navigate, especially for consumers. But the subject may become a bit simpler once Android Q rolls around, as pile of new RCS-specific APIs has popped up in AOSP, presumably bound for the next Android release. These APIs may finally provide third-party apps with the ability to work with RCS on supported carriers. 

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