Android Police

Articles Tagged:

android p

19

Android P will have a new Adaptive Battery setting for extended life

Android P will have a new Adaptive Battery setting for extended life

Earlier today, a handful of Android P DP2 features leaked out which included mention of a new Adaptive Battery setting. The new feature will allow you to "limit battery for infrequently used apps" (an incredibly technical description, if I've ever heard one). Ostensibly, the phone prevents apps from doing... something by learning how you use them over time and limiting some undefined aspect about them. 

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105

Google's Android P beta is coming to nearly a dozen different smartphones

Google's Android P beta is coming to nearly a dozen different smartphones

In an unprecedented move for Google, Android P's latest beta will be available on eleven devices. The registration just went live not too long ago, but it's not limited to just the Pixels this time. No, dear reader, Google is offering the beta to devices from other manufacturers.

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197

[Update: DP2 OTA rolling out] Android P Beta Program is now live

[Update: DP2 OTA rolling out] Android P Beta Program is now live

Google's developer preview timeline indicated that we'd see DP2 land around the same time as I/O. Well, the Android Beta Program page is now live for Android P, so DP2 can't be far behind. Interested parties should zip on over and register up their compatible devices for the convenience of OTA developer preview updates. 

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151

[Update: Video] Android P DP2 possible leak shows navigation gestures, home button that becomes a scrolling bar, adaptive battery, more

[Update: Video] Android P DP2 possible leak shows navigation gestures, home button that becomes a scrolling bar, adaptive battery, more

We're taking this leak with a grain of salt: it's either a perfectly executed set of Photoshopped images (along with very accurate timestamps) or the real deal. Supposing that it's real, Gabriel Bryne, whom I can't find anything tangible about, has somehow managed to get his hands on the Android P DP2 beta and installed it on his Pixel. He then did what any sensible man with a super secret Android release would do and took a bunch of screenshots and images of the interface.

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62

Apps on Android P will no longer be able to monitor your network activity

Apps on Android P will no longer be able to monitor your network activity

Unbeknownst to most users (myself included until recently), Android apps on current and previous versions of the OS get unrestricted access to your network activity. There's no permission for you to accidentally say okay to, it's just allowed for all. This means that any app can detect when another app is connecting to an external server, and while the content is not visible, even just the source of the connection could be used for a nefarious purpose.

With a renewed focus on privacy and data collection, not least in the wake of the recent Facebook scandals, this type of potential security flaw clearly needs to be addressed.

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33

Android P notifications could be getting new remind, send, and snooze actions

Android P notifications could be getting new remind, send, and snooze actions

Notifications on Android became a lot more powerful last year when Oreo added the ability to snooze them. You can set them to reappear 15mins, 30mins, 1hr, or 2hrs later — which is incredibly useful. Before, I found myself leaving notifications lying around in my tray for hours so I wouldn't forget to action them. Snoozing lets you get them out of the way until you need them.

Thanks to a new screenshot added to the private Play Store listing for Google's smart response app Reply, it looks like notifications in Android P are going to have even more control options.

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123

[Update: Facebook, Microsoft join in] Google is turning its pistol emoji into a squirt gun

[Update: Facebook, Microsoft join in] Google is turning its pistol emoji into a squirt gun

A few years ago, Apple was the first big emoji designer to stop rendering the "pistol" emoji as a real gun. It went from a revolver to a green squirt gun, and other companies have just started coming around. Twitter and Samsung already made the change, and now it's Google's turn. Say goodbye to the revolver and hello to the super soaker.

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95

Don’t expect lengthy software support from Motorola’s new Moto G6 and E5

Don’t expect lengthy software support from Motorola’s new Moto G6 and E5

If you’re planning to buy one of Motorola’s newest handsets, you should be aware that you won’t get lengthy software support. Motorola is promising just one major Android upgrade for the new Moto G6 series, while the Moto E5 series may not get a major update at all.

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173

Display notches: The good, the bad, and the (very) ugly

Display notches: The good, the bad, and the (very) ugly

The war on bezels has been hard-fought, and smartphone makers like Samsung, OnePlus, and Google have made steady progress in their quest to minimize wasted space. The masses have cheered the heroes on as they endeavor to end bezels, but you have to be careful what you wish for. Device makers are now trending toward display notches to shave off what little bezel is left, but not all of them are doing it very well. In fact, some display notches are little more than lazy iPhone clones. That does not mean display notches can't be done well on Android, but we don't have all the pieces of the puzzle yet.

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318

Android needs to adopt gesture navigation sooner rather than later

Android needs to adopt gesture navigation sooner rather than later

It hardly seems that long, but nearly ten years ago, the world’s first Android smartphone was announced. Android in 2008 really was barely recognizable as the operating system we know and love today, and the way we navigated that operating system was pretty different, too.

The HTC G1, or Dream as it was known in some markets, was equipped with a slew of hard buttons and even a trackball (yes, a trackball), though it also offered a full touchscreen and a slide-out keyboard. At the time, Android didn’t have a standardized system navigation layout; the G1 had buttons for opening the dialer, ending a call, going home, a menu key, and a back key, along with the clickable trackball to use as a confirmation input.

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