Android Police

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Android Open Source Project

30

Android 10 source code is now available on AOSP

While many people are enjoying — or lamenting — the upgrade to Android 10, there are some out there that are just as interested in the final source code. With each major release of Android, a huge code drop is made to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) with everything a developer needs to build the latest version of the OS. As of this morning, the code is now fully available and ready for consumption.

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27

Final version of Android 9 Pie hits AOSP


Most of our readers are probably aware that Android is an open source effort, with much of code that comprises a working image being publicly accessible—in fact, that openness is a big chunk of why people like me prefer it to other platforms. So I'm especially happy to see that the current/final Android 9 changes are hitting AOSP.

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11

Android may have native Wi-Fi Direct printing in the future

Android has a few different methods for printing, one of the easiest and most recognizable is probably Google's Cloud Print. But setting up and using a random printer from your Android-powered phone or tablet isn't quite as easy as it is from a more traditional laptop or desktop computer. According to the folks at XDA, though, that might change with the recent addition of Wi-Fi Direct printing to AOSP.  

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9

Google officially moves the AOSP issue tracker away from Google Code

The issue tracker for the Android Open Source Project, more commonly known as AOSP, has always used Google Code. However, Code was completely shut down in 2016 (with most projects being forced to read-only in 2015), but the AOSP repository remained active.

Now the AOSP issue tracker has moved over to issuetracker.google.com, which first appeared publicly to collect bug reports from the Android O Developer Preview.

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8

AOSP changelog posted for October's Nougat security updates

We're closing in on the announcement for new hardware that will carry the next version of Android, surely to be labeled 7.1. If you're looking for something to do in the meantime, we've put together some changelogs for the latest security updates, released just yesterday. The changelogs are a compilation of the messages left with each code commit to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP).

So far, five new builds have been posted, all for Android 7.0 Nougat. But the build numbers don't quite match up correctly with many of the firmware images. This could very possibly be a typo where the letters 'B' and 'R' may have been accidentally transposed.

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45

[Update: Changelogs posted for Nexus 6P] AOSP changelog posted for September's Nougat and Marshmallow security updates

September's security updates have been posted for most of the Nexus family, although a few devices are still mysteriously lagging behind on official Nougat images. The source code for most of the changes has been uploaded to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) and we've generated a list of those changes for quick and easy viewing. The security bulletin already details most of the issues resolved this month, but there may be additional details lurking behind the code, so feel free to take a look around.

There are currently five new builds posted: three for Marshmallow (MMB30W, MOB31E, MTC20K) and two for Nougat (NRD90R, NRD90S).

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94

AOSP changelog posted for Android Nougat v7.0.0_r1 (NRD90M)

Android 7.0 Nougat is now truly official and available to those of us toting around certain Nexus devices. The hardware support will grow soon, and seemingly more quickly than versions in the past. We've already seen much of what 7.0 has to offer, but there's surely much more to discover.

As always, along with the brand new firmware comes some brand new source code. There's entirely too much for one person to look through, so we instead generate a log of the changes from a previous version to make it easier to read. This is how we get some idea of what the developers at Google have been up to while they were behind the curtain.

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128

Android 7.0 Nougat is being uploaded to AOSP right now

The OTAs have been rolling out since yesterday and as of today we can get some Nexus Factory Images fresh out of the oven. It's now time for AOSP to get caught up. Google is in the process of uploading Android 7.0 Nougat and its first official build NRD90M to the Android Open Source Project.

This is obviously a major version release, so there's quite a bit of code to transfer and that always takes quite a while.

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46

AOSP changelogs posted for August security patches, developer preview 5, Wear preview 2, and a mystery Lollipop update for the Nexus 10

The odds are pretty good that if you're using a still-supported Nexus device, it's probably running August's security update by now. The factory images became available on Monday of last week and OTAs have been intermittently rolling out since then. The push to AOSP took a little longer and finally included a couple of other tags that were behind schedule. All of the changes have been compiled into their respective lists and the changelogs are ready for perusal.

Google's Android Security Bulletin details the potential vulnerabilities addressed by the August updates, but it's not too rare to see other small bug fixes and adjustments hidden among the changes.

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27

AOSP Changelogs Posted For July's Android 6.0.1 Security Updates

July's security updates went live a couple of days ago for all of the currently supported Nexus devices. The Pixel C is still unaccounted for, but it's not that unusual for it to lag a few days behind. There were some late-breaking updates for hardware drivers this month, which may also contribute to some delay on the Pixel C. In the meantime, there are plenty of changes to check out this month.

There are eight separate changelogs this month, but some of these are empty, created for Google's internal use. I've marked the ones that simply change a build number. As usual, Google's security bulletin contains explanations for most of the changes, but there are probably a couple of subtle bug fixes too.

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